buzzard


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buz·zard

 (bŭz′ərd)
n.
1. Any of various North American vultures, such as the turkey vulture.
2. Chiefly British A hawk of the genus Buteo, having broad wings and a broad tail.
3. An avaricious or otherwise unpleasant person.

[Middle English busard, hawk of the genus Buteo, from Old French, from Latin būteō.]

buzzard

(ˈbʌzəd)
n
1. (Animals) any diurnal bird of prey of the genus Buteo, typically having broad wings and tail and a soaring flight: family Accipitridae (hawks, etc). Compare honey buzzard, turkey buzzard
2. a mean or cantankerous person
[C13: from Old French buisard, variant of buison buzzard, from Latin būteō hawk, falcon]

buz•zard

(ˈbʌz ərd)

n.
1. any of several broad-winged Old World hawks of the genus Buteo and allied genera, esp. B. buteo, of Eurasia.
2. any of several New World vultures, esp. the turkey vulture.
3. a cantankerous or grasping person.
[1250–1300; Middle English busard < Old French, variant of buisard, derivative of buis(on) buzzard (< Latin būteōnem, acc. of būteō; see buteo)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buzzard - a New World vulture that is common in South America and Central America and the southern United Statesbuzzard - a New World vulture that is common in South America and Central America and the southern United States
cathartid, New World vulture - large birds of prey superficially similar to Old World vultures
Cathartes, genus Cathartes - type genus of the Cathartidae: turkey vultures
2.buzzard - the common European short-winged hawkbuzzard - the common European short-winged hawk
hawk - diurnal bird of prey typically having short rounded wings and a long tail
Buteo, genus Buteo - broad-winged soaring hawks
Translations
buteo
ratonero común
músvákur
suopis
myszołów

buzzard

[ˈbʌzəd] N (Brit) → águila f ratonera (US) → buitre m, gallinazo m (LAm), zopilote m (CAm, Mex)

buzzard

[ˈbʌzərd] nbuse f

buzzard

nBussard m

buzzard

[ˈbʌzəd] npoiana
References in classic literature ?
These papers are delivered to a set of artists, very dexterous in finding out the mysterious meanings of words, syllables, and letters: for instance, they can discover a close stool, to signify a privy council; a flock of geese, a senate; a lame dog, an invader; the plague, a standing army; a buzzard, a prime minister; the gout, a high priest; a gibbet, a secretary of state; a chamber pot, a committee of grandees; a sieve, a court lady; a broom, a revolution; a mouse-trap, an employment; a bottomless pit, a treasury; a sink, a court; a cap and bells, a favourite; a broken reed, a court of justice; an empty tun, a general; a running sore, the administration.
That,' said the Buzzard to his mate, "is the distinguished author of that glorious fable, 'The Ostrich and the Keg of Raw Nails.
Now, Sarah, haven't I told you she was older'n a grandmother, and looked more like a buzzard than a dove?
In this list may be included four species of the Caracara or Polyborus, the Turkey buzzard, the Gallinazo, and the Condor.
When the family left, the buzzard was put away with the other things.
I respectfully beg to thank you, sir, for overlooking the case of the stuffed buzzard, and the other case of the Cupid's wing--as also for permitting me to wash my hands of all responsibility in respect of the pins on the carpet, and the litter in Mr.
The coyote skulks among the scrub, the buzzard flaps heavily through the air, and the clumsy grizzly bear lumbers through the dark ravines, and picks up such sustenance as it can amongst the rocks.
They were buzzards, the vultures of the west, whose coming is the forerunner of death.
He chased the unmigratory tropi-ducks from their shrewd-hidden nests, walked circumspectly among the crocodiles hauled out of water for slumber, and crept under the jungle-roof and spied upon the snow-white saucy cockatoos, the fierce ospreys, the heavy-flighted buzzards, the lories and kingfishers, and the absurdly garrulous little pygmy parrots.
About us, like buzzards, clustered the sharks and harpies.
if I haven't to count the young ones every ten minutes, to see they are not flying away among the buzzards, or the ducks.
at your time of day to be shooting at hawks and buzzards, with eighteen open mouths to feed.