byre


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byre

 (bīr)
n. Chiefly British
A barn for cows.

[Middle English, from Old English bȳre; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

byre

(baɪə)
n
(Agriculture) Brit a shelter for cows
[Old English bӯre; related to būr hut, cottage; see bower1]

byre

(baɪər)

n.
Brit. a cow shed.
[before 800; Middle English byre, bere, Old English bȳre, akin to būr hut. See bower1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.byre - a barn for cowsbyre - a barn for cows      
barn - an outlying farm building for storing grain or animal feed and housing farm animals
Translations

byre

[ˈbaɪəʳ] Nestablo m

byre

[ˈbaɪər] n (British)étable f (à vaches)

byre

n(Kuh)stall m

byre

[baɪəʳ] n (Brit) → vaccheria, stalla
References in classic literature ?
Petersburg it was autumn--a season when, in the country, the weather is clear and keen and bright, all agricultural labour has come to an end, the great sheaves of corn are safely garnered in the byre, and the birds are flying hither and thither in clamorous flocks.
If ye see the laird, tell him what ye hear; tell him this makes the twelve hunner and nineteen time that Jennet Clouston has called down the curse on him and his house, byre and stable, man, guest, and master, wife, miss, or bairn -- black, black be their fall!"
Now Rann the Kite brings home the night That Mang the Bat sets free-- The herds are shut in byre and hut For loosed till dawn are we.
'I have met holy ones who would have cursed thee from hearthstone to byre,' said Kim to the abashed man.
Then is the time to feed up your horned oxen in the byre; for it is easy to say: `Give me a yoke of oxen and a waggon,' and it is easy to refuse: `I have work for my oxen.' The man who is rich in fancy thinks his waggon as good as built already -- the fool!
In a corner the ground sloped sharply down, and Razumov followed the light of the lantern through a small doorway into a long cavernous place like a neglected subterranean byre. Deep within, three shaggy little horses tied up to rings hung their heads together, motionless and shadowy in the dim light of the lantern.