byreman

byreman

(ˈbaɪəmən)
n, pl -men
a man who works in a byre
References in periodicals archive ?
The Byreman used similar language when I mouthed 'focaccia' to him across the crowded exhibitors' marquee at Etal Show last weekend.
I most certainly am NOT," I replied huffily (I was driving the Byreman so I'd only drunk two halves).
Lion-eyes: hostile stare directed towards domino players (are you listening, Byreman and Morebottle?
So I refuse to join Billy the Kid and the Byreman in their flood of crocodile tears over the big game hunter who dispatched Cecil the Lion in order to fill a hole on his dental surgery wall.
Natalie Bennett, the Green leader whose little grey cells let her down under Nick Ferrari's IHAVE created a monster: the Byreman is now bigger than Texas.
It is costing me friendships: These days the Byreman only reads The Journal on a Friday to see if he's in it.
All it needs is a quote from the Byreman and your column is done
Another waxed-up earful of misunderstanding: the Byreman has been raging about "bogus asylum seekers" ever since Lawnmower told him he'd taken the Lovely Sue to see a rom com (When Harry Met Sally having finally arrived in Alnwick); he thought Lawnmower was talking about illegal immigrants from the eastern bloc.
Once Morebottle's domino partner the Byreman had weighed in the story was set in concrete.
The Byreman tells a great yarn about a German prisoner of war who was assigned to help a local widow tend her garden each week until he was repatriated at the end of the war in 1945.
TALKING of female politicians, The Byreman recalls a wonderful story about Britain's first woman MP, Nancy Astor.
Some minutes later one of Gemma's rough-shod rambler companions - "the Bobble-hat Brigade", as the Byreman calls them - arrived to slanderously assert that police were on the scene, possibly "arresting an elderly man", a classic example of the journalistic hazards of reporting a single source, unchecked.