byword

(redirected from bywords)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

by·word

also by-word  (bī′wûrd′)
n.
1.
a. A proverbial expression; a proverb.
b. An often-used word or phrase.
2. One that represents a type, class, or quality: "Polyester got its déclassé reputation in the 1970s after cheap, poorly made double-knit leisure suits became a byword for bad taste" (Fortune).
3. An object of notoriety or interest: The eccentric poet was a byword in literary circles.
4. An epithet.

[Middle English byworde, from Old English bīword, translation of Latin prōverbium.]

byword

(ˈbaɪˌwɜːd)
n
1. a person, place, or thing regarded as a perfect or proverbial example of something: their name is a byword for good service.
2. an object of scorn or derision
3. a common saying; proverb
[Old English bīwyrde; see by, word; compare Old High German pīwurti, from Latin prōverbium proverb]

by•word

(ˈbaɪˌwɜrd)

n.
1. a word or phrase associated with some person or thing.
2. a common saying; proverb.
3. a person regarded as the embodiment of a particular quality.
4. an object of reproach or scorn.
5. an epithet.
[before 1050; Middle English; Old English biwyrde. See by1 (adj.), word]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.byword - a condensed but memorable saying embodying some important fact of experience that is taken as true by many people
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

byword

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
Translations

byword

[ˈbaɪwɜːd] N
1.sinónimo m
his name is a byword for successsu nombre es sinónimo de éxito
2. (= slogan) → palabra f de moda

byword

[ˈbaɪwɜːrd] n
to be a byword for → être synonyme de (fig)by-your-leave [ˌbaɪˈjəˈliːv] n
without so much as a by-your-leave → sans même demander la permission

byword

[ˈbaɪˌwɜːd] n his name is a byword for successil suo nome è sinonimo di successo
References in classic literature ?
I knew a wise man that had it for a byword, when he saw men hasten to a conclusion, Stay a little, that we may make an end the sooner.
Every mistake was attributed to me, until "Makar Alexievitch" became a byword in our department.
There is no longer a Popish tyrant on the throne of England, and by to-morrow noon, his name shall be a byword in this very street, where ye would make it a word of terror.
that is their mean yet mighty byword of reproach -- the watchword with which they assassinated, hanged, and made away with Concini; and if I gave them their way they would assassinate, hang, and make away with me in the same manner, although they have nothing to complain of except a tax or two now and then.
And besides, when folk talk of a country covered with troops, it's but a kind of a byword at the best.
The casuists have become a byword of reproach; but their perverted spirit of minute discrimination was the shadow of a truth to which eyes and hearts are too often fatally sealed,--the truth, that moral judgments must remain false and hollow, unless they are checked and enlightened by a perpetual reference to the special circumstances that mark the individual lot.