bird pepper

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bird pepper

n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bird pepper

n
1. (Plants) a tropical solanaceous plant, Capsicum frutescens, thought to be the ancestor of the sweet pepper and many hot peppers
2. (Plants) the narrow podlike hot-tasting fruit of this plant
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bird′ pep`per


n.
a variety of pepper, Capsicum anuum glabriusculum, having small, elongated berries.
[1780–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bird pepper - plant bearing very small and very hot oblong red fruits; includes wild forms native to tropical America; thought to be ancestral to the sweet pepper and many hot peppers
genus Capsicum, Capsicum - chiefly tropical perennial shrubby plants having many-seeded fruits: sweet and hot peppers
capsicum, capsicum pepper plant, pepper - any of various tropical plants of the genus Capsicum bearing peppers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of Capsicum baccatum and C. frutescens against Atta cephalotes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the symbiotic fungus Leucoagaricus gongylophorus
baccatum and C. frutescens separately were dried at room temperature and extracted with 90 % ethanol overnight (1L x 100 g), solvent was drained.
While the highest capsaicin content was taken from the Aci Cicek 52 (4.05 mg/g), the lowest capsaicin content was found in C. frutescens 24 and C.
chinense and C. frutescens did not group independently, a result that has been previously reported in isoenzyme analyses of this genus.
Although the genus Capsicum is an important food and spice crop the world over, an accurate picture of the taxonomy of this New World genus is 'a work in progress.' As early as 1852, Dunal (1) recognized as many as 63 species of Capsicum, whereas in 1923 Bailey (2) recognized only one, C. frutescens. Hunziker (3) recognized about 25 species of which five were cultivated, and identified the center of diversity for the genus as lying between eastern Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay and northern Argentina.