cabbalistic


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cabbalistic

[ˌkæbəˈlɪstɪk] ADJcabalístico
References in periodicals archive ?
It becomes the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, bearing a Cabbalistic significance from which all the narrator's far-reaching and mystic interpretations are but short steps away.
This tragedy was the outcome of palace politics and cabbalistic intrigues involving those who had sworn to assist the Emperor and were his functionaries on whom the security of the Empire rested.
Edna Aizenberg argues that Borges made the Aleph the center of the story to emphasize the importance of the cabbalistic symbol in the shaping of his world and she highlights that Borges has "given the name El Aleph--not Labyrinths--to the entire volume" (89).
In the novel, an important aspect of the cabbalistic and hermetic doctrines consists in the conclusion that the signified must never be revealed, so as not to rob it of the fascination of the secret: the 'drift'--la differance as defined by Derrida (2013)--has to be an infinite one.
Smend's claims of discovering a wealth of esoteric metaphors interlaced through his scores, based on significant numbers in the Christian and cabbalistic traditions (3, 7, 12, and multiples thereof), spawned enthusiastic number counting enterprises in the ensuing years, intent upon discovering the hermetic numerologic codes laced through Bach's scores.
Hamann gives his chapter "Aesthetica in Nuce" the subtitle "A Rhapsody in Cabbalistic Prose" (189) and regrets what he sees as the main characteristic of Christian philosophy and metaphysics: "Christianity therefore does not believe in the doctrine of philosophy, which is nothing but an alphabetical script of human speculation (.
of cabbalistic metaphors, capped with audaciously auspicious
Alex's escape from Cabbalistic experience, which symbolizes his Jewish identity, is the main theme of Book One, where some crucial points about Kabbalah are similarly introduced.
He advertised in various magazines offering a theological degree and a cabbalistic symbol at a substantial price; perhaps one hundred people eventually signed on.
Though he knew the correspondences the Golden Dawn developed between the 22 Tarot trumps--the "fifth" suit added to the regular playing deck to create the Tarot gaming deck in the fifteenth century and later imbued with esoteric significance--and the paths on the Cabbalistic Tree of Life, Waite did not include any overt references to Cabbala in his first deck.
The Golden Dawn, which we might define as inhabiting a gray area between quasi-Masonic order, cabbalistic cult, and bachelor's fraternity, experienced a surge of popularity following its inception in 1888 through the end of the 1920s.
Reuchlin's De rudimentis hebraicis (1506), a Hebrew grammar, along with his other writings on Jewish texts (notably De arte cabbalistic a [1517]) had a seismic effect in academic and theological circles.