cabinmate

cabinmate

(ˈkæbɪnˌmeɪt)
n
a person with whom one shares a cabin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The narrator, Emma Davis, the sole cabinmate of the three vanished girls, returns to Nightingale, supposedly to teach art but also to find closure.
Tabert's employer, Putnam Lumber, claimed that Tabert died of malaria, but Tabert's cabinmate wrote Tabert's family in North Dakota with the true story.
When my cabinmate returned, hours later, he saw that I was sleeping, sans blanket, and noticing that I was cold, covered me up, This seems like a such a small gesture, but it is anything but.
While he enjoys himself a lot, and is encouraged by his cabinmate Raj, the other boys are not so positive.
Sixth, the secondary attack rate for cabin contacts may be an overestimate because passengers with negative NAT results were not tested for other respiratory infections, and passengers with onset of symptoms >24 hours after symptoms developed in a cabinmate were assumed to be secondary, rather than co-primary cases.
And one evening after Alvin surfaced for the night, I, Dave, and Chris Farwell, a UCSB undergraduate student at the time (and my cabinmate aboard Atlantis) began collecting samples of sediments starting 2.2 nautical miles (4 kilometers) downstream of the oil seeps.
Should Jen (my sister and cabinmate) and I check out Sorrento's for 2 a.m.
Wisconsin college graduate Billy tries to keep his moral compass straight but finds it increasingly challenging with cabinmate Richie (Hale Appleman), a flamboyant soldier from the privileged class who has no qualms about strutting his stuff.
This threat takes on a specifically homoerotic dimension in the case of Christmas's relationship with Joe Brown/Lucas Burch, which may or may not be sexually consummated but is certainly sexually suggestive enough to upset other white men in the community with the specter of Brown/Burch's "white racial subordination" to his cabinmate's phallic charisma (185).
I woke up my cabinmate, said good night to my friend, and left.
Try saying something like this: "Before you think about going home, you'll need to spend some more time getting to know your cabinmates, and you have to take part in some of the terrific camp programs." Or, "For any camper to leave camp, we need to first get permission from the camp director, and we also need to talk with your parents."
Most of my cabinmates were knitters and embroidery artists, so evenings were spent in front of the fire with everyone curled up with a project.