cacography


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Related to cacography: retinol

ca·cog·ra·phy

 (kə-kŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. Bad handwriting.
2. Bad spelling.

cac′o·graph′ic (kăk′ə-grăf′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cacography

(kæˈkɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) bad handwriting. Compare calligraphy
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) incorrect spelling. Compare orthography
caˈcographer n
cacographic, ˌcacoˈgraphical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ca•cog•ra•phy

(kəˈkɒg rə fi)

n.
1. bad handwriting.
2. poor spelling.
[1570–80]
ca•cog′ra•pher, n.
cac•o•graph•ic (ˌkæk əˈgræf ɪk) cac`o•graph′i•cal, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cacography

- Bad handwriting or poor spelling.
See also related terms for poor.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cacography

1. bad handwriting. Cf. calligraphy.
2. the possession of poor spelling skills. See also orthography. — cacographer, n.cacographic, cacographical, adj.
See also: Writing
the practice or defect of incorrect spelling. — cacographer, n. — cacographic, cacographical, adj.
See also: Spelling
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cacography - poor handwritingcacography - poor handwriting      
handwriting, script, hand - something written by hand; "she recognized his handwriting"; "his hand was illegible"
chicken scratch - cramped or illegible handwriting
squiggle - an illegible scrawl; "his signature was just a squiggle but only he could make that squiggle"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dutch orthography served as an example for Philipp von Zesen, although the most authoritative German linguist of the era, Justus Georg Schottelius, considered him a 'language corrupter' and his way of spelling 'cacography' (Fonsen 2006:274-275).
Similarly, writer/performers such as Artemus Ward and Josh Billings became famous through "cacography," a subgenre of dialect writing using spellings that are meant primarily to indicate illiteracy and not mispronunciation.
Immediately prominent were his cacography, or humorous misspellings, and what he himself called "ingrammaticisms"--a parallel attack on grammatical conventions.