cactoblastis

cactoblastis

(ˌkæktəʊˈblɑːstɪs)
n
(Animals) a moth, Cactoblastis cactorum of South America, that was introduced into Australia to act as a biological control on the prickly pear
References in periodicals archive ?
Egg parasitoids attacking Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in North Florida.
Diel flight pattern and flight performance of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) measured on a flight mill: influence of age, gender, mating status, and body size.
En esta contribucion se hace referencia a estas ultimas y se utilizara como ejemplo la feromona sexual de Cactoblastis cactorum L.
By 1959, improvements in clearing and regrowth control and the successful introduction of Cactoblastis cactorum to control prickly pear (Land Administration Commission 1968, 1978) led to the view that these lands had the greatest potential for primary production of any land in Queensland (Payne 1959; Skerman 1959).
In the 1930s CSIR and partners used larvae from the north Argentinean moth Cactoblastis cactorum to eradicate prickly pear, which had overrun millions of acres of farmland in southern Queensland and northern New South Wales.
It quickly ran wild, overtaking the Australian desert, but was eventually checked by the introduction of the Cactoblastis, a cactus-hungry Mexican moth.
For example, the cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum managed to spread on its own from Hawaii to all the other major Hawaiian islands (Tuduri et al.
1994), rotting process (the phytophagous moth, Cactoblastis cactorum, is absent from Spain), and genetic background (e.
2005), the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) (USA) (Henneberry 2007), the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) (USA) (Carpenter et al.
The individuals in the preserve have been severely impacted by caterpillars of the moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Kass 1990, Robertson 1990).
The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum Berg (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), an invading potential pest of native Opuntia species in southeastern USA and Mexico, showed a mean fecundity of 119.