cadaverous


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ca·dav·er·ous

 (kə-dăv′ər-əs)
adj.
1. Suggestive of death; corpselike: a cadaverous odor.
2.
a. Of corpselike pallor; pallid: "I saw a cadaverous face appear at a small window" (Charles Dickens).
b. Emaciated; gaunt: a cadaverous mongrel picking through the garbage.

ca·dav′er·ous·ly adv.
ca·dav′er·ous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cadaverous

(kəˈdævərəs)
adj
1. of or like a corpse, esp in being deathly pale; ghastly
2. thin and haggard; gaunt
caˈdaverously adv
caˈdaverousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ca•dav•er•ous

(kəˈdæv ər əs)

adj.
1. of or like a corpse.
2. pale; ghastly.
3. haggard and thin.
[1620–30; < Latin]
ca•dav′er•ous•ly, adv.
ca•dav′er•ous•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cadaverous - very thin especially from disease or hunger or cold; "emaciated bony hands"; "a nightmare population of gaunt men and skeletal boys"; "eyes were haggard and cavernous"; "small pinched faces"; "kept life in his wasted frame only by grim concentration"
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare
2.cadaverous - of or relating to a cadaver or corpse; "we had long anticipated his cadaverous end"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cadaverous

adjective deathly, pale, ghastly, wan, blanched, gaunt, haggard, emaciated, bloodless, pallid, ashen, hollow-eyed, corpse-like, like death warmed up (informal), deathlike a tall, thin man with a cadaverous face
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

cadaverous

adjective
1. Gruesomely suggestive of ghosts or death:
3. Physically haggard:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
lavoniškas

cadaverous

[kəˈdævərəs] ADJcadavérico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cadaverous

[kəˈdævərəs] adj [person, face] → cadavérique; [appearance] → cadavéreux/euse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cadaverous

adj (= corpse-like)Kadaver-, Leichen-; (= gaunt)ausgezehrt, ausgemergelt; (= pale)leichenblass
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cadaverous

[kəˈdævrəs] adj (frm) → cadaverico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ca·dav·er·ous

a. cadavérico-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
His body was cadaverous. He wore the same suit that I had seen him in five years before; it was torn and stained, threadbare, and it hung upon him loosely, as though it had been made for someone else.
When the pony-chaise stopped at the door, and my eyes were intent upon the house, I saw a cadaverous face appear at a small window on the ground floor (in a little round tower that formed one side of the house), and quickly disappear.
Pride, contempt, defiance, stubbornness, submission, lamentation, succeeded one another; so did varieties of sunken cheek, cadaverous colour, emaciated hands and figures.
He was content to see his friend's cadaverous face opposite him through the steam rising from a tumbler of toddy.
I hate a man to be red and white, like a painted doll, or all sickly white, or smoky black, or cadaverous yellow.'
The friends of Firmin Richard and Armand Moncharmin thought that this lean and skinny guest was an acquaintance of Debienne's or Poligny's, while Debienne's and Poligny's friends believed that the cadaverous individual belonged to Firmin Richard and Armand Moncharmin's party.
Fix and Passepartout saw that they were in a smoking-house haunted by those wretched, cadaverous, idiotic creatures to whom the English merchants sell every year the miserable drug called opium, to the amount of one million four hundred thousand pounds-- thousands devoted to one of the most despicable vices which afflict humanity!
Some approached pure blanching; some had a bluish pallor; some worn by the older characters (which had possibly lain by folded for many a year) inclined to a cadaverous tint, and to a Georgian style.
He saw the headmaster; he walked slowly down from the schoolhouse to his own, talking to a big boy who Philip supposed was in the sixth; he was little changed, tall, cadaverous, romantic as Philip remembered him, with the same wild eyes; but the black beard was streaked with gray now and the dark, sallow face was more deeply lined.
He was a lean, somewhat cadaverous man of about her own age, whose profile was turned to them, and he was the partner of a highly-coloured girl, obviously English by birth.
In person he was cadaverous [dead looking] and blackavized [dark faced], and his hair was dressed in long curls, which at a little distance looked like black candles, and gave a singularly threatening expression to his handsome countenance.
George was too busy gloating over the money (for he had never had such a sum before), to mark the countenance or flight of the cadaverous suitor of his sister.