cadie


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cadie

(ˈkædɪ)
n
Scot a person in a large town or city in the 18th century who was on the lookout for chance employment, for example, as a messenger
[C18: a Scot variant of caddie]
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The open squad consisted of Cadie and Beth Chandler, Beth Little, Sam Carpenter, Emelye Sanders, Daniel Weightman, Stephen Beadling, Ryan Hennessey and Jamie Coe and collectively finished 43rd out of 140 teams.
James Watts with the Crackley Hall team (from left) Cadie Hardwick, Zach Rose, Soren Wasley and Jimmy Loftus
Sheena boxy leather biker jacket [euro]377, Cadie leopardprint coat [euro]328, Reiss
In a March 9, 2014, CNBC story, "Your apps might be spying on you, or worse," Cadie Thompson reported that a growing number of malicious mobile apps are doing everything from tracking people without their permission to completely taking over the smartphone's operating system.
Heart Of The Forest Acupuncture, Cadie Lynn Federmeyer, 1810 Broadway St., Bellingham, WA 98225.
THEY have been described as "Germany's most famous English folk band", and it is with typical English modesty that fiddler, guitarist and Northumbrian piper Andrew Cadie, who hails from the North East, confesses: "Well, there isn't really much competition."
He noted that the act conveying what is now New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and part of Maine to the Sieur de Monts in 1632 referred to the region as La Cadie, not L'Acadie, much less L'Arcadie, "because of something it knew," he wrote.
Mother-of-two Rachel Williams, now 40, was blasted at point-blanK range and needed Kelly Pugh, 28, is mother to six-year-old Cadie and five-year-old Millie, who are pupils of Glanffrwd.
In August they travelled to Milan - just two weeks after the birth of Phil and Twila's daughter Cadie - to see if Millie could undergo a gene therapy trial.