caesura

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Related to caesuras: cesura

cae·su·ra

also ce·su·ra (sĭ-zho͝or′ə, -zo͝or′ə)
n. pl. cae·su·ras or cae·su·rae (-zho͝or′ē, -zo͝or′ē) also ce·su·ras or ce·su·rae
1. A pause in a line of verse dictated by sense or natural speech rhythm rather than by metrics.
2. A pause or interruption, as in conversation: After another weighty caesura the senator resumed speaking.
3. In Latin and Greek prosody, a break in a line caused by the ending of a word within a foot, especially when this coincides with a sense division.
4. Music A pause or breathing at a point of rhythmic division in a melody.

[Latin caesūra, a cutting, from caesus, past participle of caedere, to cut off; see kaə-id- in Indo-European roots.]

cae·su′ral, cae·su′ric adj.

caesura

(sɪˈzjʊərə)
n, pl -ras or -rae (-riː)
1. (Poetry) (in modern prosody) a pause, esp for sense, usually near the middle of a verse line. Usual symbol: ||
2. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) a break between words within a metrical foot, usually in the third or fourth foot of the line
[C16: from Latin, literally: a cutting, from caedere to cut]
caeˈsural, caeˈsuric adj

cae•su•ra

or ce•su•ra

(sɪˈʒʊər ə, -ˈzʊər ə, sɪzˈyʊər ə)

n., pl. cae•su•ras or ce•su•ras, cae•su•rae or ce•su•rae (sɪˈʒʊər i, -ˈzʊər i, sɪzˈyʊər i)
1. a break or pause in a line of verse, marked in scansion by a double vertical line.
2. any pause or interruption.
[1550–60; < Latin]
cae•su′ral, cae•su′ric, adj.

caesura

A pause in a line, usually for sense, but forming part of the metrical foot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caesura - a pause or interruption (as in a conversation); "after an ominous caesura the preacher continued"
pause, suspension, intermission, interruption, break - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something
2.caesura - a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line
prosody, inflection - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
Translations
tauko
cezura
cesur

caesura

[sɪˈzjʊərə] N (caesuras or caesurae (pl)) [sɪˈzjʊəriː]cesura f

caesura

, (US) cesura
nZäsur f
References in classic literature ?
There is also a break or caesura which in five-syllable verses falls after the second syllable and in seven-syllable verses after the fourth.
It was in some hundreds of verses, which I did my best to balance as Pope did, with a caesura falling in the middle of the line, and a neat antithesis at the end.
Hughes, well outside her usual scholarly bailiwick, captures all this with great skill and concludes that, for all the change, 'there are no true caesuras in history: there is always some kind of continuum.
What the contributors do is make visible the violence of state power, its biopolitical caesuras of the demarcations between citizens and non, within a given citizenry, between and across humans and animals--that is a discourse of racism and speciesism as foundational to state power.
Ross conceives of and presents enchantment as questions, multiplicities, heresies, and caesuras, and he conceives of disenchantment as answers, norms, orthodoxies, grasping for closure.
Improved notation interpretation Sibelius playback has been greatly enhanced, providing better interpretation of notation distinctions such as tempo markings, metric emphasis, grace notes, mordents, caesuras, and breath marks; composers can now hear every nuance of their score played back in realistic detail, without having to hire an expensive orchestra,
Despite accolades given for a condensed and lucid monograph, one wonders why the post-revolutionary period and Stalinism were included at all, given the apparent radical caesuras of 1905 and 1917.
Early Cold War attitudes to prostitution, homosexuality, venereal disease (VD), and juvenile delinquency had deep-seated roots, for which the caesuras of 1945 or 1949 meant relatively little.
The Prussian dotation law of 1873/75 and the opening of the Frankfurt Motorway Section of 1956 mark the caesuras that frame Ruppmann's study.
In his analyses, Koch uses inverted triangles to indicate the locations of caesuras and to separate incises.
Corey teases the reader with epodes and false caesuras, daring us to lock his lines together like errant Tetris pieces to form the elusive wholeness of a conventional sonnet.
In short, Grossman's accounts make it abundantly clear that the postwar era in Germany was characterized by radical reversals, sudden and extreme shifts in values, and historical caesuras.