caesura

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cae·su·ra

also ce·su·ra (sĭ-zho͝or′ə, -zo͝or′ə)
n. pl. cae·su·ras or cae·su·rae (-zho͝or′ē, -zo͝or′ē) also ce·su·ras or ce·su·rae
1. A pause in a line of verse dictated by sense or natural speech rhythm rather than by metrics.
2. A pause or interruption, as in conversation: After another weighty caesura the senator resumed speaking.
3. In Latin and Greek prosody, a break in a line caused by the ending of a word within a foot, especially when this coincides with a sense division.
4. Music A pause or breathing at a point of rhythmic division in a melody.

[Latin caesūra, a cutting, from caesus, past participle of caedere, to cut off; see kaə-id- in Indo-European roots.]

cae·su′ral, cae·su′ric adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

caesura

(sɪˈzjʊərə)
n, pl -ras or -rae (-riː)
1. (Poetry) (in modern prosody) a pause, esp for sense, usually near the middle of a verse line. Usual symbol: ||
2. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) a break between words within a metrical foot, usually in the third or fourth foot of the line
[C16: from Latin, literally: a cutting, from caedere to cut]
caeˈsural, caeˈsuric adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cae•su•ra

or ce•su•ra

(sɪˈʒʊər ə, -ˈzʊər ə, sɪzˈyʊər ə)

n., pl. cae•su•ras or ce•su•ras, cae•su•rae or ce•su•rae (sɪˈʒʊər i, -ˈzʊər i, sɪzˈyʊər i)
1. a break or pause in a line of verse, marked in scansion by a double vertical line.
2. any pause or interruption.
[1550–60; < Latin]
cae•su′ral, cae•su′ric, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

caesura

A pause in a line, usually for sense, but forming part of the metrical foot.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caesura - a pause or interruption (as in a conversation); "after an ominous caesura the preacher continued"
pause, suspension, intermission, interruption, break - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something
2.caesura - a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line
prosody, inflection - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
tauko
cezura
cesur

caesura

[sɪˈzjʊərə] N (caesuras or caesurae (pl)) [sɪˈzjʊəriː]cesura f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

caesura

, (US) cesura
nZäsur f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
There is also a break or caesura which in five-syllable verses falls after the second syllable and in seven-syllable verses after the fourth.
It was in some hundreds of verses, which I did my best to balance as Pope did, with a caesura falling in the middle of the line, and a neat antithesis at the end.
Caesuras are often denoted by punctuation and, as in music, create breath pauses.
Hughes, well outside her usual scholarly bailiwick, captures all this with great skill and concludes that, for all the change, 'there are no true caesuras in history: there is always some kind of continuum.'
Ross conceives of and presents enchantment as questions, multiplicities, heresies, and caesuras, and he conceives of disenchantment as answers, norms, orthodoxies, grasping for closure.
Despite accolades given for a condensed and lucid monograph, one wonders why the post-revolutionary period and Stalinism were included at all, given the apparent radical caesuras of 1905 and 1917.
Koch calls such resting points caesuras, and the segments of melody they divide are called incises (similar to subphrases in today's terminology).
Corey teases the reader with epodes and false caesuras, daring us to lock his lines together like errant Tetris pieces to form the elusive wholeness of a conventional sonnet.
The exhibition's narrative is organized around three critical caesuras: 1926, when the two major organs of the movement, The Worker-Photographer and Soviet Photo, were founded; 1929, the year that worker-photography began growing beyond this initial German-Soviet dialogue to become an international initiative with cadres in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Austria, Britain, the Netherlands, and the Americas; and 1935, when Popular Front strategy shifted the movement's focus away from the rhetoric of class struggle to the creation of a united front against fascism.
In short, Grossman's accounts make it abundantly clear that the postwar era in Germany was characterized by radical reversals, sudden and extreme shifts in values, and historical caesuras. That is one of the two reasons why specialists and lay readers alike who are interested in the immediate postwar years should find this book well worth reading.
Skampa), both the two levels--the sharp contrasts and the continuity of the "story"--are equally represented and the music continues to tremble neurotically; the placing of caesuras between the terse little motifs, but also minimal or scarcely any pauses between the individual movements contribute to the success of this approach.
8: German Romanticism), the entire twentieth century, with its many historical caesuras and literary movements, is compressed into a single volume, the tenth and last of the series.