caiman

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Related to caimans: spectacled caiman

cai·man

also cay·man (kā′mən)
n. pl. cai·mans also cay·mans
Any of various tropical American crocodilians of the genus Caiman and related genera of the family Alligatoridae, differing from the alligators in having bony plates on the belly.

[Spanish caimán, from Carib acayuman.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

caiman

(ˈkeɪmən)
n, pl -mans
(Animals) a variant spelling of cayman
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cai•man

or cay•man

(ˈkeɪ mən)

n., pl. -mans.
any of several tropical American crocodilians of the genus Caiman and allied genera.
[1570–80; < Sp caimán < Carib]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caiman - a semiaquatic reptile of Central and South America that resembles an alligator but has a more heavily armored bellycaiman - a semiaquatic reptile of Central and South America that resembles an alligator but has a more heavily armored belly
crocodilian, crocodilian reptile - extant archosaurian reptile
genus Caiman - caimans
Caiman sclerops, spectacled caiman - caiman with bony ridges about the eyes; found from southern Mexico to Argentina
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

caiman

[ˈkeɪmən] Ncaimán m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

caiman

nKaiman m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Licences for exotic animals classed as "dangerous wild animals", such as cobras, ostriches and caimans, are granted by local authorities.
Phenix also leased 5,200 square feet at Caimans Plaza, 941 Caimans Road in Massapequa, N.Y; Dan Glazer of Ripco represented the property owner in that transaction.
The would-be croc owner has applied for a dangerous wild animals licence to keep a couple of spectacled caimans.
And, lurking beneath the waters of domestic enclosures, are 10 alligators, nine crocodiles and 17 caimans - a smaller member of the crocodile family.
And lurking beneath the waters of domestic enclosures are 10 alligators, nine crocodiles and 17 caimans - a smaller member of the crocodile family.
In Central Bedfordshire, meanwhile, wolves, alligators, caimans, black widow spiders, venomous snakes and short-clawed otters are being kept.
Caimans live in South and Central America and are related to alligators and crocodiles.
In the end, the baby caimans were the ones to pay the price of the lax legislation.
Troubled by low numbers of broad-snouted caimans, as well as substantial reductions in natural wetland habitat, wildlife managers in Argentina began to mobilize, and in 1990 initiated Proyecto Yacare, or Caiman Project.