calcinosis


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cal·ci·no·sis

 (kăl′sə-nō′sĭs)
n.
An abnormal condition in which calcium salts are deposited in a part or tissue of the body.

[calc(i)- (influenced by calcine) + -osis.]

calcinosis

(ˌkælsɪˈnəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) the abnormal deposition of calcium salts in the tissues of the body

cal•ci•no•sis

(ˌkæl səˈnoʊ sɪs)

n.
an abnormal condition characterized by the deposit of calcium salts in various tissues of the body.
[1925–30]
Translations

cal·ci·no·sis

n. calcinosis, presencia de sales cálcicas en la piel, los tejidos subcutáneos y los órganos.

calcinosis

n calcinosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
These include growth retardation and rickets (a disease affecting bone development) in children, and a series of metabolic disorders such as low potassium levels (hypokalemia), high calcium levels (hypercalcemia), elevated calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria) resulting in kidney stones, the formation of calcium deposits in the kidneys (calcinosis) as well as possible kidney failure.
Radiography of her hands revealed the resorption of the distal phalangeal tufts (acro-osteolysis) and soft tissue calcifications (calcinosis cutis) (Figure 2).
Early symptoms of toxicity include gastrointestinal disorders, bone pain, lethargy, severe headaches, arrhythmia, frequent urination, calcinosis, and nephrolithiasis.
Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is a very rare disorder of phosphate homeostasis resulting from decreased fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) synthesis or activity (1).
Deposition of insoluble calcium salts in the tissue, cutaneous calcinosis (CC), can be caused by various diseases.
Among the cutaneous features (Table 1), fingertip ulceration was found in 36 (66.7%), sclerodactyly in 48 (88.8%) (Figure 1), digital pitted scars in 30 (55.5%) (Figure 2), digital gangrene in 3 (5.6%), calcinosis cutis in 4 (7.4%), microstomia in 48 (88.8%) (Figure 3), radial furrows around mouth in 18 (33.3%) (Figure 4), pinched nose in 33 (61.1%), diffuse alopecia in 10 (18.5%) and nail changes in 10 (18.5%) cases.
To the Editor: Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a rare genetically degenerative disease that is generally characterized by symmetrical, bilateral calcinosis in the basal ganglia, thalamus, dentate nuclei, and other brain regions and mainly manifests with neurological and psychiatric symptoms.
Tumoral calcinosis in infants: a report of three cases and review of the literature.
Patients met 2013 ACR/ EULAR criteria, 1980 ACR criteria, or at least three of five features of CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) syndrome.
Localized calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis: Successful treatment with intralesional corticosteroids injection.
Children with more severe courses of the disease may also suffer from heart and lung complications, calcinosis (small lumps of calcium under the skin or in the muscles), vasculitic ulcers (holes in the skin or gastrointestinal tract), and in some severe cases it can even be fatal.