calendrical

(redirected from calendrically)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

ca·len·dri·cal

 (kə-lĕn′drĭ-kəl) also ca·len·dric (-drĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or used in a calendar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.calendrical - relating to or characteristic of or used in a calendar or time measurement; "calendric systems"; "solstice is a time of calendric importance"
References in periodicals archive ?
Benedict Anderson's description of novelistic perspective as "a sociological organism moving calendrically through homogeneous, empty time" in Imagined Communities (1983) importantly links the unique spatio-temporality of the novel form with the conditions of possibility for a nationalistic imaginary grounded in the rise of print culture (24-26).
As Anderson argues, "the idea of a sociological organism moving calendrically through homogeneous, empty time is a precise analogue of the idea of the nation, which also is conceived as a solid community moving steadily down (or up) history" (p.
288-425), generally following the pattern of a one-year course of calendrically determined fasting, dietary restrictions, and hygiene methods for curling the hair, whitening the teeth, and obtaining fuller breasts, to name a few.
Calendrically, it is commemorated through Good Friday and Easter Day.
At the time of testing, as Anderson would say, all of the students in Thailand are the "sociological organism[s] moving calendrically through homogeneous, empty time" (Ibid.
I observed that the numbers arranged in calendrically significant patterns were used for agricultural purposes in the "farm account books" kept by the khipukamayuq (accountant or warehouse keeper) to facilitate the closing of his accounting books (see Tables 1, 2 and 3).
As Anderson notes, this "idea of a sociological organism moving calendrically through homogeneous, empty time is a precise analogue of the idea of the nation, which also is conceived as a solid community moving steadily down (or up) history" (26).
Grass emphasizes the middle and Paul Pokriefke's location there calendrically, politically, and attitudinally.
Dates are very eye-catching in inscriptions, as well as easier to decipher than the bulk of a text, and Ericeira's calendrically macaronic date of "'ultimos de Agosto' of 443 AH" (443 AH/1051 CE) might well be the correct date of the earlier inscription.
Calendrically congruent and visually powerful interactions of sunlight with ancient architecture actually do occur in Egypt.