rota

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Ro·ta

 (rō′tə, -tä)
An island of the western Pacific Ocean in the southern Mariana Islands north of Guam. The Japanese used it as a base for their attack on Guam, December 8-11, 1941. Rota remained in Japanese hands until the end of the war.

Ro′ta·nese′ (-nēz′, -nēs′) adj. & n.

ro·ta

 (rō′tə)
n.
1. Chiefly British A roll call or roster of names.
2. Chiefly British A round or rotation of duties.
3. Rota Roman Catholic Church A tribunal of prelates that serves as an ecclesiastical court.

[Latin, wheel; see ret- in Indo-European roots.]

rota

(ˈrəʊtə)
n
chiefly Brit a register of names showing the order in which people take their turn to perform certain duties
[C17: from Latin: a wheel]

Rota

(ˈrəʊtə)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the supreme ecclesiastical tribunal for judging cases brought before the Holy See

ro•ta

(ˈroʊ tə)

n., pl. -tas.
1. a roster.
2. Chiefly Brit. a round or rotation of duties; a period of work or duty taken in rotation with others.
3. (cap.) Official name, Sacred Roman Rota. an ecclesiastical tribunal in Rome, constituting the court of final appeal.
[1650–60; < Latin: wheel]

Rota

 a rotation of persons undertaking some duty or form of work; a list of such persons.
Examples: rota of qualified jurors, 1878; of people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rota - (Roman Catholic Church) the supreme ecclesiastical tribunal for cases appealed to the Holy See from diocesan courts
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
court, judicature, tribunal - an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
2.rota - a roster of names showing the order in which people should perform certain duties
roster, roll - a list of names; "his name was struck off the rolls"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom

rota

noun schedule, list, calendar, timetable, roster the washing-up rota
Translations
قائِمَة أسْماء
rozpis služeb
turnusliste
szolgálati beosztás jegyzéke
verkefnalisti
grafiks
rozpis služieb
görev listesinöbet cetveli

rota

[ˈrəʊtə] N (esp Brit) → lista f (de tareas)

rota

[ˈrəʊtə] ntableau m de service
on a rota basis → par roulement

rota

n
(Brit) → Dienstplan m
(Eccl) RotaRota f

Rota

[ˈrəʊtə] n (Rel) the Rotail Tribunale della Sacra Rota

rota

[ˈrəʊtə] ntabella dei turni
on a rota basis → a turno

rota

(ˈrəutə) noun
a list showing duties that are to be done in turn, and the names of the people who are to do them.
References in periodicals archive ?
ENPNewswire-July 30, 2019--ION announces second quarter 2019 earnings and conference call schedule
'For the shipping companies that were banned, they will only suffer loss in the disorganisation of their call schedule for their vessels.
Additionally, the growing emphasis on care coordination has made enterprise access to the centralized call schedule increasingly vital.
* Also on the conference call schedule is content company Time Warner (not to be confused with the similarly-named cable company).
We maintain an ER call schedule of the active staff in case there are two urgent cases at the same time.
We recently had a third OB join our community, so we are experimenting with a weekend call schedule. It has been 2 months since we began this new arrangement, but it still seems strange to have two whole days oft.
Make your call schedule fit family needs when possible.
Some surgical programs are cutthroat pyramids in which half the trainees are slated "washout" before graduation, and some have an every second night call schedule (thirty six hours on duty, followed by twelve off, then on again for thirty six)--a punishment some surgical subspecialists endure until they are in their mid-thirties.