callithumpian

Related to callithumpian: shivaree

callithumpian

(ˌkæləˈθʌmpɪən)
adj
informal US relating to or resembling a callithump

callithumpian

a participant in a noisy mock serenade, as a charivari.
See also: Performing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.callithumpian - of or relating to a callithump
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References in periodicals archive ?
The evenings feature fabulous programs performed by the faculty and the ensemble-in-residence Callithumpian Consort.
New England Conservatory Symphony Orchestra, Callithumpian Consort, Stephen Drury, conductor.
Callithumpian Consort of New England Conservatory, Charles Peltz, conductor.
Dale Cockrell has noted that blackface was used not just in Shakespeare's Othello, but also in Callithumpian bands and in Lord of Misrule festivities.
Even after the Revolution, "Callithumpian bands"--echoing ancient European traditions--had continued to parade about, beating on pans, shouting and groaning, mocking the powerful and overly dignified.
Keynote addresses will be given by Richard Toop (Sydney Conservatorium) and Kyle Gann (Bard College), with concerts by the Callithumpian Consort directed by Stephen Drury and Boston Modern Orchestra Project directed by Gil Rose.
This was the tradition of carnival - charivaris, mumming, callithumpian bands - whose raucous carryings-on symbolically challenged the social order.
If on the night before Christmas, 1822, a New York gentlemen like Clement Clarke Moore heard "such a clatter" out on the lawn he might very well have expected to have found a "callithumpian band" of drunken working-class youths forcing their way into his home demanding alcohol, food, and money.
Similar in origin to slave Christmas, burlesque parades borrowed on premodern Christmas traditions involving costumed, sometimes transvestite, "fantasticals" and "callithumpians" who temporarily inverted the social order.