calmative


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calm·a·tive

 (kä′mə-tĭv, kăl′mə-)
adj.
Having relaxing or pacifying properties; sedative.
n.
A sedative.

calmative

(ˈkælmətɪv; ˈkɑːmə-) or

calmant

adj
(Medicine) (of a remedy or agent) sedative
n
(Medicine) a sedative remedy or drug

calm•a•tive

(ˈkɑ mə tɪv, ˈkæl mə-)
adj.
1. having a soothing or sedative effect.
n.
2. a calmative agent.
[1865–70]
Translations

calm·a·tive

a. calmante, sedante.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Last month, Kiehl's rolled out Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil Herbal Concentrate, a lightweight, calmative facial oil that is said to help to improve the appearance of skin prone to imperfections such as visible redness and discomfort.
Successful ageing comprises of calmative adaptation at each phase of life.1 Old age is supposed to be the center of calamities and trepidation due to lack of social support, financial problems, and loss of energy.
If you visit LUSH's website or take a look at social media, you will see users are still giving feedback on its calmative effect.
That may sound creepy, but the users giving feedback on its calmative effect are singing its praises.
Starting from these insights, Pearson's argument seeks to move toward new conclusions about Beckett's cosmopolitanism: his nouvelle "The Calmative" (1955), for instance, deals in both the investigation of abstract philosophical crises and the repetition of halting departures and failed returns that dramatize "the impossibility of negating a place one has yet to understand" (120).
Lev and Amar [20] reported that, in Kingdom of Jordan, the carob kibble is known as stomach strengthener and phlegm clearer; the carob jam is also used for tongue sores and stomachache treatments and the seed is usually used as purgative and toothache calmative. Some researchers have also reported carob uses for its therapeutic virtues as diuretic, anti-diarrheal, antitussive, and warts remover [21-23].
'I don't know when I died', the narrator of The Calmative says at the opening of his narrative, in an impossible posthumous gambit which mirrors the opening of Dickinson's poem; (22) and Beckett's writing career, from the Unnamable on, is nothing more than an extended attempt to imagine the death of the imagination, to conjure a kind of seeing that continues, after the difference between seeing and unseeing, between living and dying, has been cancelled.
After this story, he wrote the novel Mercier et Camier (started in 1946, published in 1970 in French, in 1974 in Beckett's English translation) and the other Nouvelles: L'Expulse (1946, published in 1946; The Expelled, published in 1962); Premier Amour (1946; published in 1970; First Love, published in 1973); Le Calmant (1946, published in 1955; The Calmative, published in 1967).
Calmative agents are chemical warfare agents that disable personnel by causing temporary physiological effects (paralysis, blindness, deafness, etc.) and mental effects or creating both effects.
Ligusticum Chuanxiong - a plant with antispasmodic, calmative and antithrombotic features.
I even once witnessed a mountain lion as it rolled like a giant house cat in a pungent stand of wild valerian, utilizing the calmative, relaxing effects of the pungent herb through unique olfactory receptors--the same nose-direct-to-brain connection by which housecats enjoy a dose of catnip.
The US government should hold its head in shame, as Saudi forces used US-made weapons to counter the protesters, including live ammunition, rubber bullets, stun grenades, Tasers, bean-bag rounds, teargas canisters, and calmative agents.