calmative

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calm·a·tive

 (kä′mə-tĭv, kăl′mə-)
adj.
Having relaxing or pacifying properties; sedative.
n.
A sedative.

calmative

(ˈkælmətɪv; ˈkɑːmə-) or

calmant

adj
(Medicine) (of a remedy or agent) sedative
n
(Medicine) a sedative remedy or drug

calm•a•tive

(ˈkɑ mə tɪv, ˈkæl mə-)
adj.
1. having a soothing or sedative effect.
n.
2. a calmative agent.
[1865–70]
Translations

calm·a·tive

a. calmante, sedante.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical calmatives delivered as an aerosol render subjects unconscious by depressing neurological functions.
According to its energetics, valerian was considered by Disocorides to possess 'warming properties' and it was widely used by Eclectic physicians who commented that valerian was 'one of the best calmatives for the collective condition termed nervousness' (Sarris 2010, Hechtman 2012).
43) They span the entire spectrum of technology and include such things as firearms that inflict blunt trauma but are not intended to be fatal (by using rubber and plastic bullets), tear gas or other noxious vapors such as CS or CN, sticky and slippery foams, pepper spray, acoustic rays, projectile netting, chemical calmatives, and directed energy heat ray systems.
These chemicals consist of RCAs, vomiting agents, psychochemicals, calmatives, and malodorants.
in his book Herbs of Choice, agents used to treat anxiety or insomnia are referred to by numerous names, including "sleep aids, sedatives, hypnotics, soporifics, antianxiety agents, anxiolytics, calmatives and minor tranquilizers.
Calmatives often have less than a tenfold difference between effective and lethal dosages.
Capable of taking out enemy soldiers without killing them, calmatives were once seen as ideal from a public relations standpoint.
Calmatives are neurochemical weapons funded by the U.
Calmatives are part of neuroscientific technologies that might also help military organizations to collect intelligence, enhance military prowess, and degrade enemy capabilities.
The development of this new generation of [nonlethal] weapons incorporates knowledge from the remarkable advances made in medical science; two examples are calmatives [compounds that depress or inhibit the function of the central nervous system] and eye attack lasers.
Given the exigencies of modern warfare, it is no surprise that the world did not condemn Russia's use of a calmative agent when storming a Moscow theater in 2002, or that the 2008 Second Review Conference on the CWC could not agree on the status of incapacitating chemical weapons.
JNLWP has planned computer simulations of the offensive use of calmative agents, contracted with a major US military supplier to develop an overhead-exploding chemical riot control mortar round, and field-tested new non-lethal weapons (but not biological ones) on humans in Kosovo.