calotype


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Related to calotype: Collodion process

calotype

(ˈkæləʊˌtaɪp)
n
1. (Photography) an early photographic process invented by W. H. Fox Talbot, in which the image was produced on paper treated with silver iodide and developed by sodium thiosulphite
2. (Photography) a photograph made by this process
[C19: from Greek kalos beautiful + -type]
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) These initiatives would seem to spur Helen Groth's and Ivan Kreilkamp's shared fascination with Victorian poets' immersion in a culture whose chronology coincided with hugely influential advances in technology, such as the calotype and the photograph.
Alongside the daguerreotypes, glass ambrotypes, calotype negatives and cartes de visites will be all manner of photographic memorabilia, including medals, letters and handbills.
William Henry Fox Talbot coined "calotype" in 1840 for his developed-paper negative, which led to the first practical method of negative-positive printing in photography.
When Prevost returned to New York, he traded his brush for a camera and began experimenting with the calotype process, a waxed-paper process that he introduced to America.
Although somewhat similar effects had been achieved before -- the calotype (Talbotype) could also soften the image by reducing detail to some extent -- Stieglitz was among the first to realize that one could attack 'the photographic', as it had hitherto been conceived (the 'documentary,' [34]), by leaving room for the idea that it could be transformed into a projection of the mind.
1841 - William Henry Fox Talbot patents the Calotype, a negative-positive photo process.
The collection comprises approximately 850 photographic prints (mainly salted paper), 230 Calotype paper negatives and 160 Collodion glass negatives.
2) evokes the precision of detail that Ruskin valued in the daguerreotype, a quality not achievable in the softer medium of the calotype (a paper-based form of photography that emerged in the 1840s as a competitor to Louis Daguerre's metallic process).
King-Tenison would have known of calotype photography pioneered in the 19th century in this country by William Fox Talbot, where a negative could be used to make a number of positive prints on paper.
(20) A calotype image of 'Kitchen Hut, Gnarkeet Station, Port Phillip' taken by squatter Robert Tennant before 1853 is in the collection of the Edinburgh Calotype Club.
The view of the stable secured by Morell with his 4 x 5 over the course of an eight-hour open-shutter session is the same one Fox Talbot captured in 1840 for his first chemically developed calotype print, Combining modern technology and old-fashioned optics, Morell creates an engaging document that blurs past and present, inside and outside--a romantic work filled with an awe of scientific inquiry.