calotype

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Related to calotype process: William Henry Fox Talbot

calotype

(ˈkæləʊˌtaɪp)
n
1. (Photography) an early photographic process invented by W. H. Fox Talbot, in which the image was produced on paper treated with silver iodide and developed by sodium thiosulphite
2. (Photography) a photograph made by this process
[C19: from Greek kalos beautiful + -type]
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References in periodicals archive ?
With the arrival of the calotype process (patent from 1841) the development of black and white (B&W) negative-positive system began and, as a portrait technique, is still present, especially in the area of art gallery photography.
The slow calotype process (see note) (8) meant that photographs of people in action were not possible.
These experiments led him to develop the calotype process, and the production, in 1835, of the first ever negative, a picture of the Oriel window at Lacock.
Although collodion was a watershed in photography, using the earlier calotype process was considerably less of an ordeal for travel photographers; paper negatives could be prepared at home, exposed on location and developed upon one's return.