calque

(redirected from calqued)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to calqued: loan translations

loanwords and loan translations

English takes many of its words from different languages around the world. These words are broadly known as borrowings, and are subdivided into two categories: loanwords and loan translations.
A loanword is a term taken from another language and used without translation; it has a specific meaning that (typically) does not otherwise exist in a single English word. Sometimes the word’s spelling or pronunciation (or both) is slightly altered to accommodate English orthography, but, in most cases, it is preserved in its original language.
A loan translation (also known as a calque), on the other hand, is a word or phrase taken from another language but translated (either in part or in whole) to corresponding English words while still retaining the original meaning.
Continue reading...

calque

 (kălk)
tr.v. calqued, calque·ing, calques
To make a loan translation from (a word in another language).

[French, from calquer, to trace, copy, from Italian calcare, to press, from Latin calcāre, to tread on, from calx, heel.]

calque

(kælk)
n
(Linguistics) another word for loan translation
vb, calques, calquing or calqued
(Art Terms) (tr) another word for calk3
[C20: from French: a tracing, from calquer, from Latin calcāre to tread]

calque

(kælk)

n., v. calqued, cal•quing. n. v.t.
2. to form (a word or phrase) through the process of loan translation.
[1655–65; < French, n. derivative of calquer to copy, base on]

calque


Past participle: calqued
Gerund: calquing

Imperative
calque
calque
Present
I calque
you calque
he/she/it calques
we calque
you calque
they calque
Preterite
I calqued
you calqued
he/she/it calqued
we calqued
you calqued
they calqued
Present Continuous
I am calquing
you are calquing
he/she/it is calquing
we are calquing
you are calquing
they are calquing
Present Perfect
I have calqued
you have calqued
he/she/it has calqued
we have calqued
you have calqued
they have calqued
Past Continuous
I was calquing
you were calquing
he/she/it was calquing
we were calquing
you were calquing
they were calquing
Past Perfect
I had calqued
you had calqued
he/she/it had calqued
we had calqued
you had calqued
they had calqued
Future
I will calque
you will calque
he/she/it will calque
we will calque
you will calque
they will calque
Future Perfect
I will have calqued
you will have calqued
he/she/it will have calqued
we will have calqued
you will have calqued
they will have calqued
Future Continuous
I will be calquing
you will be calquing
he/she/it will be calquing
we will be calquing
you will be calquing
they will be calquing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been calquing
you have been calquing
he/she/it has been calquing
we have been calquing
you have been calquing
they have been calquing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been calquing
you will have been calquing
he/she/it will have been calquing
we will have been calquing
you will have been calquing
they will have been calquing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been calquing
you had been calquing
he/she/it had been calquing
we had been calquing
you had been calquing
they had been calquing
Conditional
I would calque
you would calque
he/she/it would calque
we would calque
you would calque
they would calque
Past Conditional
I would have calqued
you would have calqued
he/she/it would have calqued
we would have calqued
you would have calqued
they would have calqued
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calque - an expression introduced into one language by translating it from another language; "`superman' is a calque for the German `Ubermensch'"
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
Translations
kalk
käännöslaina
kalkkalkirati
tükörfordítás
lánsþýðing

calque

[kælk] Ncalco m (on de)
References in periodicals archive ?
This sense that change will always and inevitably characterize the outcome of any of the forms of transits that claim the name of translation, in its primary verbal sense or otherwise, underlies the theorized uncertainty apparent in a recent description of translation (offered by cultural studies scholars) as "the (im)possibility of meaningful commensuration." (22) And this assumption that whatever is carried over can never remain the same, or equivalent even (in a formally calqued way), indeed informs the readings of dislocations, realized in a variety of forms and media, that are offered in the papers below.
Instead, all synchronically nontransparent modifiers were excluded from the study (see above) and modifiers which are calqued from Latin yet semantically transparent were coded into their respective category, such as perceptual--colour for lat.
It may have been intended to be merely a topographic descriptor, but it has been interpreted as a descriptive toponym because today the headland bears the calqued (literally translated) name Steep Point.
The corpus also encompasses metric system units, which were widely assimilated, and occasionally calqued (libra < pound, pie < foot, pulgada < inch, yarda < yard).
TV texts are less prestigious than cinema texts, and thus their translation will easily present a higher number of traits calqued on the source text.
In this sense, it implies 'yellow river', which is close to the meaning of Huanghe River with the same meaning 'huang' ('yellow') and 'he' ('river') and is supposed to be a calqued word.
(38.) According to Yoshida 2000: 86-87 and 2009: 574, such Sogdian expressions are calqued on the Uygur formula ukus ukus koyul ayitu, lit.
Notwithstanding, some may constructions in Tasawaq may be calqued on Hausa, such as aaru may gaabi 'a strong man (lit.
Tom Shippey argues that Tolkien basically 'calqued' the Shire from Edwardian England, by which he means that the author of The Hobbit took bits and pieces from English culture and society and reconstituted them back together again translated into a creatively new form neither belonging fully to the real world nor to Middle-earth (115-116), in the same manner as "Mirkwood" is a calque from Old Norse, but is strictly speaking neither genuinely Old Norse nor Modern English.
Calqued from the German Kulturosophie or kulturosophisches Denken as used in the work of Slavists (Mjor mentions Igor Smirnov, Rainer Grubel, and Dirk Uffelmann [55]), this term denotes "a discourse on Russia and Russian culture, led by Russians themselves, which is not only descriptive but also axiological and based on dichotomies" (55-56).
Indeed, the expression "ordinary people," partly calqued on the French "ecritures ordinaires," is a somewhat awkward rendering that seeks to elide the determinism of class, but arguably reinforces a certain elitism in regard to the subjects Lyons studies.