calumny


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cal·um·ny

 (kăl′əm-nē)
n. pl. cal·um·nies
1. A false statement maliciously made to injure another's reputation.
2. The utterance of maliciously false statements; slander.

[Middle English calumnie, from Old French calomnie, from Latin calumnia, from calvī, to deceive.]

calumny

(ˈkæləmnɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. the malicious utterance of false charges or misrepresentation; slander; defamation
2. such a false charge or misrepresentation
[C15: from Latin calumnia deception, slander]

cal•um•ny

(ˈkæl əm ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. a false and malicious statement designed to injure a reputation.
2. slander; defamation.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin calumnia< calvī to deceive + -ia -y3)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calumny - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actionscalumny - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
assassination, blackwash, character assassination - an attack intended to ruin someone's reputation
malignment, smear, vilification - slanderous defamation
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
slander - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
name calling, names - verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument; "sticks and stones may break my bones but names can never hurt me"
epithet, name - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
2.calumny - an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
attack - strong criticism; "he published an unexpected attack on my work"

calumny

calumny

noun
The expression of injurious, malicious statements about someone:
Law: libel.
Translations
клевета
calumnia
baksnakkbaksnakkingbaktalelsebaktaling
kalumniaoszczerstwo

calumny

[ˈkæləmnɪ] N (frm) → calumnia f

calumny

n (liter)Schmähung f (geh), → Verunglimpfung f

calumny

[ˈkæləmnɪ] n (frm) → calunnia
References in classic literature ?
The headstones were fallen and broken across; brambles overran the ground; the fence was mostly gone, and cows and pigs wandered there at will; the place was a dishonor to the living, a calumny on the dead, a blasphemy against God.
What I mean by being proof against calumny is being able to point to the fact as a contradiction.
This was no calumny, and yet I remember well, somewhere far back in the late seventies, that the crew of that ship were, if anything, rather proud of her evil fame, as if they had been an utterly corrupt lot of desperadoes glorying in their association with an atrocious creature.
Yet we know by happy experience that the public trust was not betrayed; nor has the purity of our public councils in this particular ever suffered, even from the whispers of calumny.
Think better of it, Barbara, and pay no more heed to foolish advice and calumny, but read your book again, and read it with attention.
If your enemy had told me that you had ever talked as you talk now, that you had ever looked as you look now, I would have turned my back on him as the utterer of a vile calumny against a just, a brave, an upright man.
Supposing you are right in your indictment, how can you raise any question of calumny or gossip, in your case?
Yes; that is to say, he fought for the independence of the Greeks, and hence arises the calumny.
Yes, if you will not consent to retract that infamous calumny.
quickly joined those who advocate for the singling out of the Jewish state for calumny.
My heroine, Shona McMonagle, who works in Morningside Library, went to Marcia Blaine and remains outraged by Muriel Spark's book which she thinks is a foul calumny on her alma mater.
Barros has denied the accusations, and Francis backed him by saying the victims' claims were "all calumny.