Calypso

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Ca·lyp·so 1

 (kə-lĭp′sō)
n. Greek Mythology
A sea nymph who delayed Odysseus on her island, Ogygia, for seven years.

[Latin Calypsō, from Greek Kalupsō, from kaluptein, to conceal; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

Ca·lyp·so 2

or ca·lyp·so (kə-lĭp′sō)
n. pl. Ca·lyp·sos or ca·lyp·sos also Ca·lyp·soes or ca·lyp·soes
A type of music that originated in the West Indies, notably in Trinidad, and is characterized by improvised lyrics on topical or broadly humorous subjects.

[Probably alteration (influenced by Calypso, in reference to the nymph's island home) of Caribbean English kaliso, variant of kariso, variant of kaiso, bravo (shout of approval for a Calypsonian's performance), Calypso music, from ka iso!, shout of encouragement with which West Indian slaves accompanied singers singing satirical songs about plantation owners and overseers, from Efik ka isu, go on (imperative form) (from ka, go, advance + isu, face, front, forward), and its Ibibio equivalent kaa iso.]

Ca·lyp·so′ni·an (kə-lĭp-sō′nē-ən, kăl′ĭp-) n.

ca·lyp·so

 (kə-lĭp′sō)
n. pl. ca·lyp·sos
A terrestrial orchid (Calypso bulbosa) native to northern temperate regions, having a rose-pink flower with an inflated pouchlike lip usually marked with white, purple, and yellow.

[Probably Latin Calypsō, Calypso; see Calypso1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

calypso

(kəˈlɪpsəʊ)
n, pl -sos
1. (Music, other) a popular type of satirical, usually topical, West Indian ballad, esp from Trinidad, usually extemporized to a percussive syncopated accompaniment
2. (Dancing) a dance done to the rhythm of this song
[C20: probably from Calypso]

calypso

(kəˈlɪpsəʊ)
n, pl -sos
(Plants) a rare N temperate orchid, Calypso (or Cytherea) bulbosa, whose flower is pink or white with purple and yellow markings
[C19: named after Calypso]

Calypso

(kəˈlɪpsəʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth (in Homer's Odyssey) a sea nymph who detained Odysseus on the island of Ogygia for seven years
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ca•lyp•so

(kəˈlɪp soʊ)

n., pl. -sos.
1. a sea nymph who detained Odysseus on the island of Ogygia for seven years.
2. (l.c.) a musical style of West Indian origin, influenced by jazz, usu. having topical, often improvised, lyrics.
3. (l.c.) a terrestrial orchid, Calypso bulbosa, of the Northern Hemisphere, having a single variegated purple, yellow, and white flower.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

calypso

- The style in which a shirt's tails are tied in a knot at the waist.
See also related terms for waist.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Calypso - rare north temperate bog orchid bearing a solitary white to pink flower marked with purple at the tip of an erect reddish stalk above 1 basal leafcalypso - rare north temperate bog orchid bearing a solitary white to pink flower marked with purple at the tip of an erect reddish stalk above 1 basal leaf
orchid, orchidaceous plant - any of numerous plants of the orchid family usually having flowers of unusual shapes and beautiful colors
2.Calypso - (Greek mythology) the sea nymph who detained Odysseus for seven years
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
sea nymph - (Greek mythology) a water nymph who was the daughter of Oceanus or Nereus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
karibská píseň
calypso
kalipszó
kalypsó
kalipsas
kalipso
kalypso
kalipso

calypso

[kəˈlɪpsəʊ] Ncalipso m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

calypso

nCalypso m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

calypso

(kəˈlipsəu) plural caˈlypsos noun
a West Indian folk-song, telling of a current event and sometimes made up as the singer goes along.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Calypso," she murmured, nodding towards Lucille, "is by your side."
Besides, if Lucille is Calypso, what about Penelope?"
So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had got safely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return to his wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had got him into a large cave and wanted to marry him.
And Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, if, then, the gods now mean that Ulysses should get home, we should first send Mercury to the Ogygian island to tell Calypso that we have made up our minds and that he is to return.
Like Calypso, who could not be consoled at the departure of Ulysses, our Gascon could not console himself for not having guessed why Aramis had asked Percerin to show him the king's new costumes.
But you are dripping, my dear fellow; you must change your clothes, as Calypso said to Telemachus.
(15) who with the lord Apollo and the Rivers have youths in their keeping -- to this charge Zeus appointed them -- Peitho, and Admete, and Ianthe, and Electra, and Doris, and Prymno, and Urania divine in form, Hippo, Clymene, Rhodea, and Callirrhoe, Zeuxo and Clytie, and Idyia, and Pasithoe, Plexaura, and Galaxaura, and lovely Dione, Melobosis and Thoe and handsome Polydora, Cerceis lovely of form, and soft eyed Pluto, Perseis, Ianeira, Acaste, Xanthe, Petraea the fair, Menestho, and Europa, Metis, and Eurynome, and Telesto saffron-clad, Chryseis and Asia and charming Calypso, Eudora, and Tyche, Amphirho, and Ocyrrhoe, and Styx who is the chiefest of them all.
He chucks Chambermaid (the Right Honourable Lord Southdown) under the chin; she seems to deplore his absence, as Calypso did that of that other eminent traveller Ulysses.
West Indian Rhythm: Trinidad Calypsos on World and Local Events, Featuring the Censored Recordings 1938-1940
His songs were subtle and complex calypsos that mined the lyrical core of one of the most musical of the Caribbean nations.