cameralism


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Related to cameralism: Haskalah

cameralism

the theories and adherence to the theories of the cameralists. — cameralist, n. — cameralistic. adj.
See also: Economics
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So, whereas the 'cameralism' in 'neocameralism' refers to the fact that the capitalist corporation owns the state as its sovereign property much as a traditional monarch, the 'neo' denotes the way that the CEO-sovereign is particularly motivated to improve rather than hamper its residents' lives to maximize rent, and hence profits.
In the 18th and 19th century Germany, Kameralwissenschaft ("Cameralism") represented a form of public economics.
Although the French Enlightenment was focused on individual rights, the Austrian Enlightenment was more practical, focusing on cameralism, or the use of state power to generate wealth; an educated citizenry was crucial to that project.
Peter and especially Catherine, Raeff argued, were inspired in part by the European administrative philosophy of cameralism, which emphasized rationalism, individual initiative, and self-interest and presupposed implementation by "intermediary bodies" and trained officials.
Known as cameralism, this combination paradigm in governance and public finance sought to provide practical guidance for rulers seeking to raise revenue from their lands, in order to provide them the means to perpetuate their regimes (Wagner and Backhaus 1987; Wagner 2012).
As such, liberalism is profoundly distinct from cameralism and its administrative expression polizeiwissenschaft, in reaction to which, in Germany, it arose.
Beyond that, it should be mentioned that Cameralism was taught in Germany at the University of Halle even earlier, since 1727, though with much more limited scope compared to the plan of both Genovesi's and Beccaria's Chairs in Italy.
Such a concept of police harks back to 18th-century cameralism and police science, and picks up on the centrality of the police idea in the work of a variety of thinkers, from Adam Smith to Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel.
The name cameralism, for instance, refers to the chamber where a prince's advisors would gather to advise the prince.
They covered late-Medieval and Renaissance accounting (Scottish included), the evolution of printed financial reports, the development of university audits, European state accounting of the Enlightenment (Cameralism), early railway accounting, the evolution of modern French accounting, the work of Schmalenbach, and the emergence of cash-flow accounting.