cameralist


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cameralist

a mercantilist economist of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries who believed in the doctrine that a nation’s wealth could be made greater by increasing its supply of money. — cameralistic, adj.
See also: Economics
References in periodicals archive ?
Catherine II, however, comes across as both a committed cameralist reformer, whose efforts to fix and institutionalize the problems of administration, of finance, of town organization, of religious diversity appear here as general successes--and as "ever the pragmatist," who "did not hesitate to maintain different tax and governance regimes in communities when it was economically or politically advisable to do so" (306).
He nevertheless concluded, very much in the sense of a cameralist's view of the population and its economic value, that "every kind of atrophy of the physical shape of the population ...
While the origins of public finance as a systematic field of study can be dated to the cameralist writers who appeared in the Germanic lands in the 16th century (Backhaus and Wagner 1987), probably the best known early and systematic statement of public finance occurs in Book V of Adam Smith's (1776) Wealth of Nations.
This conjunction can be found, arguably, in Humboldt's critique of the cameralist politics of state welfare and his vision of a night watchman state unshackling the self-activity of individuals; in Constant's critique of the excessively moralistic conception of ancient liberty; and, of course, in Mill's articulation of his "one simple principle" in On Liberty (it is also clearly prefigured in Adam Smith's analysis of the "natural system of liberty").
The lack of a clearly delineated private-public divide in Russia distinguished it from the eighteenth-century German lands, where cameralist reformists gradually delineated the private sphere, as Isabel Hull has shown.
Their prefaces appealed not just to the physician's need to know what remedies were at hand, but also to the naturalist's pride in backyard discoveries, the cameralist's anxiety about economic self-sufficiency, the conservative's fear of the foreign, and the natural theologian's appreciation of creation and its creator.
Police (polizei in German) was at its essence a continental concept connoting family of regulatory institutions in the German cameralist vein.
For instance, the cameralist regimes that emerged in the 16th century were operated quite differently from the various mercantilist empires to their west.
Furthermore, cameralist plans hatched during the Enlightenment to create a network of priest-doctors came to nothing in Germany and Sweden.