campness

campness

(ˈkæmpnəs) or

campiness

n
the quality of being camp
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is great fun, retaining the same sense of perspective anarchy that made The Lego Movie so perfect, and remembers to poke fun at the inherent campness and madness of superheroes in costume.
He was the only real Batman to the kids of my generation; sending himself up with a straight-faced, yet tongue-incheek comic-book campness.
Their paying guests consist of Chris Wren, played with endearingly elaborate campness by Oliver Gully, the rude battleaxe Mrs Boyle (a tweed-wearing Louise Jameson) and the unexpected foreigner with a penchant for the piano - and the ladies - Mr Paravicini, brought to life by Gregory Cox.
Everyone's got a bit of campness about them" - Singer Olly Murs.
Unfortunately, the glossy reimagining of the central doctrine in Christianity is plodding and occasionally veers into the realms of campness, courtesy of unintentionally hilarious dialogue.
The pirates are fun, encapsulating a perfect balance of evil and campness.
Man Of Steel is cast in the mould of Batman Begins, removing any traces of campness or charm that distinguished the 1970s and 1980s big screen incarnations.
I'm talking, of course, about Louie Spence - the irrepressible, twirling glitter ball of hi-NRG campness who shot to fame and into our screens on Sky1's Pineapple Dance Studio a few years ago.
Loads of contestants have been invited, like Rylan Clark and the Showbears for added campness.
I like this phrase, partly for its Carry On campness ("Ooh, matron, I've got three burly men trying to force their way into my crisis corridor"), partly because it sounds like a junior version of George W Bush's Axis of Evil.