campylobacter

(redirected from campylobacters)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

campylobacter

(ˌkæmpɪləʊˈbæktə)
n
(Microbiology) a rod-shaped bacterium that causes infections in cattle and man. Unpasteurized milk infected with campylobacter is a common cause of gastroenteritis
[from Greek kampulos bent + bacter(ium)]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Market surveillance for contamination with thermotolerant campylobacters on various categories of chicken meat in Switzerland.
This is a common mutation in quinolone resistant campylobacters which usually confers cross-resistance to nalidixic acid (4).
Campylobacters termotolerantes en aves de la ciudad de Iquitos.
Generally, campylobacters have been known to cause diseases in humans since the early 1900's and the chicken has long been associated with the presence of Campylobacter spp.
There is new material on the extent of Campylobacter in the food supply, transmission of antibiotic- resistant campylobacters from food to animals, and control of Campylobacter at the food source.
Validation of a polymerase chain reaction/restriction enzyme analysis method for species identification of thermophilic campylobacters isolated from domestic and wild animals.
ABSTRACT Shellfish including oysters (Crassostrea gigas), cockles (Cerastoderma edule) and mussels (Mytilus edulis), have previously been described as an important source of thermophilic campylobacters, with the potential of causing acute bacterial gastroenteritis in humans.
Campylobacters are found everywhere in nature, even in house pets, who may carry the bacteria without harm to themselves.
These campylobacters cannot grow at all under 30[degrees]C, less than most peak spring and autumn temperatures, so poor food storage multiplication cannot be an issue (unlike other food poisoning bacteria).
Digestive disorders and diarrhea caused by the bacterial Campylobacter is among the common illnesses primarily in developing countries, and 5 to 15 percent of diarrhea in these countries are instigated by the bacteria, and the prevalence of the bacteria as a cause of diarrhea in our country has been reported to be from 2 to 10 % (11), and even the primary cause of death in developed countries, especially among children under 5 in the United States, was attributed to such bacteriain that two million cases of bacterial infection are reported each year (18).
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently screened Campylobacter strains from its historical culture collection and identified 4 additional human cases of infection with this subspecies.