rehabilitation

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re·ha·bil·i·tate

 (rē′hə-bĭl′ĭ-tāt′)
tr.v. re·ha·bil·i·tat·ed, re·ha·bil·i·tat·ing, re·ha·bil·i·tates
1. To restore to good health or useful life, as through therapy and education: rehabilitate a patient; rehabilitate a prison inmate.
2. To restore to good condition: rehabilitate a storefront; rehabilitate the economy.
3. To cause to be regarded again in a positive way; reestablish esteem for: rehabilitate a reputation; rehabilitate a forgotten poet.
4. To restore the former rank, privileges, or rights of: Under the new regime, party members who had been sent to prison were rehabilitated.

[Medieval Latin rehabilitāre, rehabilitāt-, to restore to a former rank : Latin re-, re- + Late Latin habilitāre, to enable; see habilitate.]

re′ha·bil′i·tat′a·ble adj.
re′ha·bil′i·ta′tion n.
re′ha·bil′i·ta′tive adj.

rehabilitation

(ˌriːəˌbɪlɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Social Welfare) the act or process of rehabilitating
2. (Medicine) med
a. the treatment of physical disabilities by massage, electrotherapy, or exercises
b. (as modifier): rehabilitation centre.

rehabilitation

1. The processing, usually in a relatively quiet area, of units or individuals recently withdrawn from combat or arduous duty, during which units recondition equipment and are rested, furnished special facilities, filled up with replacements, issued replacement supplies and equipment, given training, and generally made ready for employment in future operations.
2. The action performed in restoring an installation to authorized design standards.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rehabilitation - the restoration of someone to a useful place in societyrehabilitation - the restoration of someone to a useful place in society
restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
correctional rehabilitation - providing penal custody or probation or parole for convicted offenders
physical rehabilitation, physical restoration, therapeutic rehabilitation - providing help for disabled persons; the removal or reduction of disabilities
vocational rehabilitation - providing training in a specific trade with the aim of gaining employment
2.rehabilitation - the conversion of wasteland into land suitable for use of habitation or cultivationrehabilitation - the conversion of wasteland into land suitable for use of habitation or cultivation
restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
re-afforestation, reforestation - the restoration (replanting) of a forest that had been reduced by fire or cutting
urban renewal - the clearing and rebuilding and redevelopment of urban slums
3.rehabilitation - vindication of a person's character and the re-establishment of that person's reputation
vindication, exoneration - the act of vindicating or defending against criticism or censure etc.; "friends provided a vindication of his position"
4.rehabilitation - the treatment of physical disabilities by massage and electrotherapy and exercises
physiatrics, physical therapy, physiotherapy - therapy that uses physical agents: exercise and massage and other modalities

rehabilitation

noun
The systematic application of remedies to effect a cure:
Informal: rehab.
Translations
إعادَة تأهيل
rehabilitace
rehabilitering
rehabilitálás
endurhæfing
rehabilitácia

rehabilitation

[ˈriːəˌbɪlɪˈteɪʃən]
A. Nrehabilitación f
B. CPD rehabilitation centre Ncentro m de rehabilitación

rehabilitation

[ˌriːhəbɪlɪˈteɪʃən] n
[offender] → réhabilitation f
[patient] → rééducation frehabilitation centre n (for drug or alcohol problems)centre m de désintoxication

rehabilitation

n
(of refugee, troops, the disabled)Eingliederung fin die Gesellschaft; (of ex-criminal)Rehabilitation f; (of drug addict, alcoholic)Therapie f
(= restoration of position)Rehabilitation f; (of reputation)Wiederherstellung f

rehabilitation

[ˈriːəˌbɪlɪˈteɪʃn] n (of offender, of disabled) → ricupero, reinserimento

rehabilitate

(riːəˈbiliteit) verb
to bring (a criminal or someone who has been ill) back to a normal life, normal standards of behaviour etc by treatment or training.
ˈrehaˌbiliˈtation noun

re·ha·bil·i·ta·tion

n. rehabilitación, acto de rehabilitar.

rehabilitation

n rehabilitación f
References in periodicals archive ?
I also regularly attended sessions with the Macmillan Cancer Rehabilitation Scheme at Tudor Grange in Solihull, which really helped me to maintain my fitness.
An active leader in Sutherland's pro bono program, Ann's public service work includes serving on the board for the Federal Circuit Bar Association PTO Pro Bono Committee, the Southern Center for Human Rights, TurningPoint Breast Cancer Rehabilitation, and the Women in Technology Foundation.
Pain is a psychological trigger for worry about cancer recurrence," said Julie Silver of Harvard Medical School, a specialist in cancer rehabilitation.
Thanks to the hard work and dedication of our authors and reviewers, this issue includes important new work for all professionals involved in oncology physical therapy and cancer rehabilitation," Cindy Pfalzer adds.
The patients testimonials became a sidelight at the launch of the Guangdong Provincial Light of Life Society for Cancer Rehabilitation, the Jinan University-Fuda International Postgraduate Training for Cancer, the International Cryosurgery Center for Pancreatic Cancer and the Li Chaolong Modern China Medicine Research held here recently.
The visionary work of students, from designing celestial observatories at Druridge Bay to imagining Gibside Hall as a cancer rehabilitation and hydrotherapy centre (to give just a couple of examples), is testament to the University's approach.
Of the respondents, 44% (n = 254) reported that cancer rehabilitation programs were most difficult to access.
This not 'just' one of those 110 hospitals; this facility in Las Vegas is solely for cancer rehabilitation.
Recently, two staff members qualified as cancer rehabilitation exercise instructors, after a course run by Macmillan specialists.
Dr Campbell said: "I work with Macmillan and oncology teams to try to ensure that exercise-based cancer rehabilitation is included in the cancer-care pathway.

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