cancerous


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Related to cancerous: Cancerous tumor

can·cer

 (kăn′sər)
n.
1.
a. Any of various malignant neoplasms characterized by the proliferation of anaplastic cells that tend to invade surrounding tissue and metastasize to new body sites.
b. The pathological condition characterized by such growths.
2. A pernicious, spreading evil: A cancer of bigotry spread through the community.

[Middle English; see canker.]

can′cer·ous (kăn′sər-əs) adj.

Can·cer

 (kăn′sər)
n.
1. A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Leo and Gemini.
2.
a. The fourth sign of the zodiac in astrology.
b. One who is born under this sign. In all senses also called Crab.

[Middle English, from Latin; see canker.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cancerous - relating to or affected with cancer; "a cancerous growth"
malignant - dangerous to health; characterized by progressive and uncontrolled growth (especially of a tumor)
2.cancerous - like a cancer; an evil that grows and spreads; "remorse was cancerous within him"; "pornography is cancerous to the moral development of our children"
malign - evil or harmful in nature or influence; "prompted by malign motives"; "believed in witches and malign spirits"; "gave him a malign look"; "a malign lesion"
Translations
سَرَطاني
rakovinnýtrpící rakovinou
cancer-kræft-
rákos
krabbameins-
rakovinový
kanserli

cancerous

[ˈkænsərəs] ADJcanceroso
to become cancerouscancerarse

cancerous

[ˈkænsərəs] adj [growth, cell] → cancéreux/eusecancer patient ncancéreux/euse m/fcancer research ncancérologie f; (in appeals, funds, charities)recherche f sur le cancer, recherche f contre le cancercancer specialist ncancérologue mf

cancerous

adjkrebsartig; cancerous growth (lit, fig)krebsartige Wucherung

cancerous

[ˈkænsrəs] adjcanceroso/a

cancer

(ˈkӕnsə) noun
1. a diseased growth in the body, often fatal. The cancer has spread to her stomach.
2. the (often fatal) condition caused by such diseased growth(s). He is dying of cancer.
ˈcancerous adjective

can·cer·ous

a. canceroso-a.

cancerous

adj canceroso
References in periodicals archive ?
Folkman and his colleagues decided to test whether choking off the blood supply to a cancerous tumor could destroy it.
Biomoda's technology is based on a patented porphyrin application that preferentially binds to cancerous or aberrant cells extracted from lung sputum samples.
The hybrid system has appropriate biocompatibility and solubility due to the presence of the linear dendritic polymer in physiologic environment, is able to kill cancerous cells due to the presence of doxorubicin anti-cancer drug, is able to quickly pass through the cell walls due to the presence of carbon nanotubes, and can be monitored and directed towards the cancerous tissue due to the presence of iron nanoparticles.
In a study to establish whether green tea has anti-cancerous potential in human stomach and colon cancers, 6 cancerous and 6 non-cancerous adjacent human gastric tissues and 7 cancerous and 7 non-cancerous adjacent colon tissues were obtained from patients who underwent surgery for stomach and colon cancer in the Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of General Surgery, Turkey.
The scientists attribute the differences to changes in mitochondria that occur when a cell becomes cancerous.
SCORES of cats nationwide have had their ears amputated because sunburn caused cancerous growths, it was revealed yesterday.
Merrin misdiagnosed a cancerous tumor that is expected to kill him within two years.
One standard approach to curing cancer is to kill off malignant cells, and doctors consider their treatment a success when no cancerous cells remain.
Most significantly, BIOMODA has conducted research showing how to use TCPP staining with automated microscopy and/or flow cytometry to accurately detect cancerous and pre-cancerous conditions in human tissues several years in advance of technology available today.
The 8-year-old was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumor in December 1997, said his mom, Tasha Noriega.
The prostate from only 1 of 61 men appeared cancerous.
The new approach comes from the opposite direction: Understand what's wrong inside the cancerous cell, then design a medicine that corrects just that.