candescence


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Related to candescence: dimmed

can·des·cence

 (kăn-dĕs′əns)
n.
The state of being white hot; incandescence.

[From Latin candēscēns, candēscent-, present participle of candēscere, inchoative of candēre, to shine; see candid.]

can·des′cent adj.
can·des′cent·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some artists liken it to the mythological Phoenix where it recurrently regenerates itself by arising amidst a spectacle of flames and candescence. This makes it a fitting symbol of resilience, rising and rebirth," Mak said back then.
She added: 'Some artists liken it to the mythological Phoenix where it recurrently regenerates itself by arising amidst a spectacle of flames and candescence.'
The moment was ripe for Blackmore to be caught like a sour-pussed losing Oscar nominee or fume in quiet candescence, "I thought I'd got rid of you two".
In "Summer Rain," the speaker maintains a delicate balance between inner reflection and outward speculation as he contemplates his lover's back while she tends to the garden: "I see that scalloping of bone / Along your spine--/ Discs of pure candescence / Curved among the pole beans--." The poet possesses a flare for metaphor, in addition to cultivating a sense of longing for his subject matter, even when, ironically, she is fully present before him.