canonic


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ca·non·i·cal

 (kə-nŏn′ĭ-kəl) also ca·non·ic (-ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or required by canon law.
2. Of or appearing in the biblical canon.
3. Conforming to orthodox or well-established rules or patterns, as of procedure.
4. Of or belonging to a cathedral chapter.
5. Of or relating to a literary canon: a canonical writer like Keats.
6. Music Having the form of a canon.

ca·non′i·cal·ly adv.
can′on·ic′i·ty (kăn′ə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.canonic - appearing in a biblical canon; "a canonical book of the Christian New Testament"
2.canonic - of or relating to or required by canon law
3.canonic - reduced to the simplest and most significant form possible without loss of generality; "a basic story line"; "a canonical syllable pattern"
standard - established or well-known or widely recognized as a model of authority or excellence; "a standard reference work"; "the classical argument between free trade and protectionism"
4.canonic - conforming to orthodox or recognized rules; "the drinking of cocktails was as canonical a rite as the mixing"- Sinclair Lewis
orthodox - adhering to what is commonly accepted; "an orthodox view of the world"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
For, not to hint of this: that it is an inference from certain canonic teachings, that while some natural enjoyments here shall have no children born to them for the other world, but, on the contrary, shall be followed by the joy-childlessness of all hell's despair; whereas, some guilty mortal miseries shall still fertilely beget to themselves an eternally progressive progeny of griefs beyond the grave; not at all to hint of this, there still seems an inequality in the deeper analysis of the thing.
But as interesting as anything in the book is a piece by Bojan Bujic who points out that notation was, until recently, merely an aide memoire for performance and that its elevation to canonic status is something which would surprise most of the composers whose work dominates the repertoire.
I am going to use the poetry selected for the canonic Donald M.
If none of the resulting pairs violates the rules of harmony, the line is accepted as canonic and is either printed out directly to the waiting composer or saved in a file for later printing.
Chapter 6 follows Robert's collaborations with Clara and Joachim, two virtuosos whose interpretations of canonic repertoire gained them reputations as "priests" of high art.
Nice canonic solo work by the trumpets, as well as the horn and trombone.
Mr Gachau had taken oath of Canonic obedience," Bishop Kagunda told the court.He was put to task by Mr Gachau's lawyer David Onsare, after it was found that the bishop had no powers to appoint anybody else as chairman of the tribunal.
Such atmospherics reinforce the by-now canonic reading of the "Opens" as born of Matisse's struggle with Cubism, a conflict emblematized in the blurred linear scaffoldings of such masterworks as View of Notre Dame, Paris or French Window at Collioure (both 1914).
Examples illustrate the architecture and computation of linear phase FIR, a zero phase filter, a frequency sampling filter bank, lattice FIR, band-pass equiripple FIR, the canonic signed digit coefficient, state variable filter models, fixed-point effects, and multirate systems.
These opportunities include passage work in octaves between players, tempo fluctuations, pedaling, canonic entrances, as well as trading of lines from one player to the other.
The presence of two such canonic, not to say iconic works helped to attract an exceptionally large audience and the greatest enthusiasm - and there was a lot of it - was displayed for pianist Martin Roscoe's account of the Tchaikovsky.
One is left with is the thought that while an architectural practice producing a huge number of buildings can only be expected to produce canonic work occasionally, it can provide a fine general benchmark against which most practices would be proud to be judged.