Canterbury

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Can·ter·bur·y

 (kăn′tər-bĕr′ē, -brē, -tə-)
A city of southeast England east-southeast of London. Its 11th-century cathedral, the seat of the primate of the Church of England, became an important medieval pilgrimage center after the murder there of Thomas à Becket (1170).

canterbury

(ˈkæntəbərɪ; -brɪ)
n, pl -buries
1. (Furniture) a late 18th-century low wooden stand with partitions for holding cutlery and plates: often mounted on casters
2. (Furniture) a similar 19th-century stand used for holding sheet music, music books, or magazines

Canterbury

(ˈkæntəbərɪ; -brɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a city in SE England, in E Kent: starting point for St Augustine's mission to England (597 ad); cathedral where St Thomas à Becket was martyred (1170); seat of the archbishop and primate of England; seat of the University of Kent (1965). Pop: 43 552 (2001). Latin name: Durovernum
2. (Placename) a regional council area of New Zealand, on E central South Island on Canterbury Bight: mountainous with coastal lowlands; agricultural. Chief town: Christchurch. Pop: 520 500 (2004 est). Area: 43 371 sq km (16 742 sq miles)

Can•ter•bur•y

(ˈkæn tərˌbɛr i, -bə ri; esp. Brit. -bri)

n.
1. a city in E Kent, in SE England: early ecclesiastical center of England. 132,400.
2. a municipality in E New South Wales, in SE Australia: suburb of Sydney. 115,100.
Can`ter•bu′ri•an (-ˈbyʊər i ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Canterbury - a town in Kent in southeastern England; site of the cathedral where Thomas a Becket was martyred in 1170; seat of the archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church
Kent - a county in southeastern England on the English Channel; formerly an Anglo-Saxon kingdom, it was the first to be colonized by the Romans
Translations

Canterbury

[ˈkæntəbərɪ]
A. NCantórbery m
B. CPD Canterbury Tales NPLCuentos mpl de Cantórbery
References in periodicals archive ?
But in the index to his Canterburies Doome (1646) he wrote simply and laconically, that Lewis had "fled hence for sodomy.
It read: 'Sometimes jester to his majestie, but exiled the court by Canterburies malice, with a relation for whom an odd chair stood voide in Hell.
The full title of this pamphlet is Canterburies Dreame: in which the Apparation of Cardinall Wolsey did present himselfe unto him on the fourteenth of May last past: it being the third night after my Lord of Stratford had taken his fare-well to the World.