canvasser


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can·vass

 (kăn′vəs)
v. can·vassed, can·vass·ing, can·vass·es
v.tr.
1. To examine carefully or discuss thoroughly; scrutinize: "The evidence had been repeatedly canvassed in American courts" (Anthony Lewis).
2.
a. To go through (a region) or go to (persons) to solicit votes or orders.
b. To conduct a survey of (public opinion); poll.
v.intr.
1. To make a thorough examination or conduct a detailed discussion.
2. To solicit voters, orders, or opinions.
n.
1. An examination or discussion.
2. A solicitation of votes or orders.
3. A survey of public opinion.

[From obsolete canvass, to toss in a canvas sheet as punishment, from canvas.]

can′vass·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.canvasser - a petitioner who solicits contributions or trade or votescanvasser - a petitioner who solicits contributions or trade or votes
fundraiser - someone who solicits financial contributions
petitioner, requester, suppliant, supplicant - one praying humbly for something; "a suppliant for her favors"
2.canvasser - someone who examines votes at an election
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
examiner, inspector - an investigator who observes carefully; "the examiner searched for clues"
3.canvasser - someone who conducts surveys of public opinion; "a pollster conducts public opinion polls"; "a headcounter counts heads"
asker, enquirer, inquirer, querier, questioner - someone who asks a question
4.canvasser - a person who takes or counts votes
vote counter, teller - an official appointed to count the votes (especially in legislative assembly)
Translations
agitátor
stemmehverver
kortes
undirskriftasafnari; atkvæîasmali
oy toplayan / kapı kapı gezen kimse

canvasser

[ˈkænvəsəʳ] N
1. (Pol) → persona f que hace campaña electoral para un partido en una zona concreta
2. (Comm) → promotor(a) m/f

canvasser

[ˈkænvəsər] n (political)agent m/f électoralcanvas shoes npl (with rubber sole)chaussures fpl en toile; (with rope sole)espadrilles fpl

canvasser

n
(Pol) → Wahlhelfer(in) m(f)
(Comm) → Vertreter(in) m(f), → Klinkenputzer(in) m(f) (inf)

canvasser

[ˈkænvəsəʳ] n (Pol) → propagandista m/f (elettorale) (Comm) → piazzista m

canvass

(ˈkӕnvəs) verb
to go round (an area) asking (people) for (support, votes, custom etc). We're canvassing for the Conservative Party candidate.
ˈcanvasser noun
References in periodicals archive ?
The canvasser said a deal was struck to give Moonbeams founder Willie Power that sum.
If he approves the scheme, the bonus will be paid at pounds 10 for every 1percent increase in the response rate a canvasser gets on a particular round.
When selling a 1970 MGB GT in a newspaper for what Classic Car magazine would have thought reasonable (we certainly did), the only viewer was a canvasser of a Gateshead dealer, who basically wanted it for nothing.
Until recently I worked as an administrator or canvasser in every parliamentary by- election over a period of 55 years, and I too helped in the Bermondsey contest assisting Peter Tatchell.
A Labour party spokeswoman said the canvasser, in Stroud, Gloucestershire, had made a genuine mistake and thought it was a wedding limousine.
I am a real person (one of the silent majority) and any political canvasser is turned away.
I GOT terribly excited last night because I thought I had my first canvasser of Election 2001.
We are impressed with the whole team," said Byron Canvasser, board member, father-in-law of Mr.
Paul Canvasser is a nationally renowned interior designer who has been featured in House Beautiful magazine, and whose own residence was spotlighted on HGTV's Homes Across America.
I AM writing to ask whether any other Mail readers had a visit from the NPower canvasser recently and whether they had any luck in actually getting rid of him.
The report says: "Our experience is that electors are more likely to return their forms by post than hand them to a canvasser.
We are told their conversation went like this: A canvasser asked if our Labour stalwart voted for the party in 2001?