canvasser


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can·vass

 (kăn′vəs)
v. can·vassed, can·vass·ing, can·vass·es
v.tr.
1. To examine carefully or discuss thoroughly; scrutinize: "The evidence had been repeatedly canvassed in American courts" (Anthony Lewis).
2.
a. To go through (a region) or go to (persons) to solicit votes or orders.
b. To conduct a survey of (public opinion); poll.
v.intr.
1. To make a thorough examination or conduct a detailed discussion.
2. To solicit voters, orders, or opinions.
n.
1. An examination or discussion.
2. A solicitation of votes or orders.
3. A survey of public opinion.

[From obsolete canvass, to toss in a canvas sheet as punishment, from canvas.]

can′vass·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.canvasser - a petitioner who solicits contributions or trade or votescanvasser - a petitioner who solicits contributions or trade or votes
fundraiser - someone who solicits financial contributions
petitioner, requester, suppliant, supplicant - one praying humbly for something; "a suppliant for her favors"
2.canvasser - someone who examines votes at an election
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
examiner, inspector - an investigator who observes carefully; "the examiner searched for clues"
3.canvasser - someone who conducts surveys of public opinion; "a pollster conducts public opinion polls"; "a headcounter counts heads"
asker, enquirer, inquirer, querier, questioner - someone who asks a question
4.canvasser - a person who takes or counts votes
vote counter, teller - an official appointed to count the votes (especially in legislative assembly)
Translations
agitátor
stemmehverver
kortes
undirskriftasafnari; atkvæîasmali
oy toplayan / kapı kapı gezen kimse

canvasser

[ˈkænvəsəʳ] N
1. (Pol) → persona f que hace campaña electoral para un partido en una zona concreta
2. (Comm) → promotor(a) m/f

canvasser

[ˈkænvəsər] n (political)agent m/f électoralcanvas shoes npl (with rubber sole)chaussures fpl en toile; (with rope sole)espadrilles fpl

canvasser

n
(Pol) → Wahlhelfer(in) m(f)
(Comm) → Vertreter(in) m(f), → Klinkenputzer(in) m(f) (inf)

canvasser

[ˈkænvəsəʳ] n (Pol) → propagandista m/f (elettorale) (Comm) → piazzista m

canvass

(ˈkӕnvəs) verb
to go round (an area) asking (people) for (support, votes, custom etc). We're canvassing for the Conservative Party candidate.
ˈcanvasser noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, many remain confused over the difference between the two, including the Phoenix Police Department.<br />My canvasser, a person of color with a significant developmental disability, was recently stopped when Phoenix police rolled up in two squad cars and detained him for looking "suspicious" and "soliciting." My canvasser was respectful and complied with every command the officers gave.
Ross has quickly risen through the ranks at RKF, having begun his career with RKF in 2007 as a college intern and then a canvasser. He was promoted to Senior Director in 2014.
TELESALES Canvasser Susan Wilkinson has worked at the Examiner for just over 2 years and loves every minute of her job.
Anyone who is unsure about the identity of someone claiming to be a canvasser should ask to see their proof of identity before answering any questions.
Dzikowski admitted being drunk and disorderly and stealing a laptop bag owned by a street canvasser. He was jailed for six weeks.
The cartoon was based on a post on the election-projection Web site FiveThirtyEight.com : "So a canvasser goes to a woman's door in Washington, Pennsylvania.
Mr Richards, 61, pictured, said an argument erupted on his doorstep after a local election canvasser knocked on his door.
Rod Richards was accused of trying to attack a canvasser going door-to-door near his home in Cardiff last night.
One reader tells how he received a phone call last Sunday from a Labour canvasser saying he was from the local party although, as he puts it, 'he sounded local - local to somewhere inside the M25'.
The Toronto enumeration areas, each the geographic area covered by one census canvasser, had a median population of 400.
It had been a stroke of genius to deploy canvassers in major American cities; a Greenpeace canvasser in, say, Boston, became a familiar sight.