capellmeister


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capellmeister

(kæˈpɛlˌmaɪstə) or

kapellmeister

n
(Classical Music) a person in charge of an orchestra, esp in an 18th-century princely household. See also maestro di cappella
[from German, from Kapelle chapel + Meister master]
References in periodicals archive ?
He also praised him, in Der vollkommene Capellmeister (1739), as a coach and rehearser:
Jonasova mentions that the most significant source of information on Sehling's youth is his own request for the position of Capellmeister at Prague's St Vitus Cathedral in 1737.
Art director and capellmeister of the orchestra Nur Omurbayev is determined to bring modern, progressive trends to collective to promote inter-cultural communication.
Furthermore, although the watermarks featuring the letters HSC (supposedly standing for "Heinrich Schutz Capellmeister") and a bow and arrow (Sagittarius = Schutz) point to Schutz's ownership, both marks by themselves are common during the early-modern period (see Edward Heawood, Watermarks, Mainly of the 17th and 18th Centuries [Hilversum: The Paper Publications Society, 1950]; The Nostitz Papers: Notes on Watermarks Found in German Imperial Archives of the 17th & 18th Centuries, and Essays Showing the Evolution of a Number of Watermarks [Hilversum: The Paper Publications Society, 1956]).
In 1970 the German capellmeister Karl Maria Pisarowitz began his article "Mozarts Schnorrer Leutgeb.
Tosi and Quantz (Versuch einer Anweisung die Flote transversiere zu spielen, 1752) touch on the importance of vowels and consonants, while Mattheson (Der vollkommene Capellmeister, 1739) gives the French accolades for text declamation.
Italian influence had always been marked in the music of Germany from the sixteenth century onward, as is evidenced in the compositions of Michael Praetorius and Heinrich Schutz (who visited Italy twice), and the presence of Italians in German courts, such as Dresden, that had five or six Italians in its capella, including Antonio Scandello, capellmeister between 1568 and 1580.
(4.) In Der vollkommene Capellmeister, Johann Mattheson surveys what a chapel conductor needs to know: "The doctrine of the temperaments and emotions concerning which especially Descartes is to be read because he dealt with music a lot, serves very well here since it teaches one to distinguish between the feelings of the listeners and how the forces of sound affect them," Mattheson (1739), p.
Mattheson, Der vollkommene Capellmeister (Hamburg, 1739), p.482.)
(16) Johann Mattheson, Der vollcommene Capellmeister (Hamburg: Christian Herold, 1739), translated by Ernest C.
Handel's choice of dance types in the final scene is particularly appropriate in the light of Mattheson's discussion of dance affects in Der vollkommene Capellmeister (and one might add that the proliferation of minuets in the finale is another modern feature): Mattheson assigns to the minuet an affect of 'massige Lustigkeit' ('moderate gaiety'), while the gavotte is said to express 'jauchzende Freude' ('triumphant joy').(36)
The argument is enriched by the fact that the author discusses and makes use of works which have been all too often neglected, such as Descartes' Compendium of Music, Johann Mattheson's Vollkommen Capellmeister or Rousseau's Essai sur l'origine des langues.