capital gain


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to capital gain: Capital gain tax

capital gain

n.
The amount by which proceeds from the sale of a capital asset exceed the original cost.

capital gain

n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) the amount by which the selling price of a financial asset exceeds its cost

cap′ital gain′


n.
profit from the sale of assets, as bonds or real estate.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capital gain - the amount by which the selling price of an asset exceeds the purchase price; the gain is realized when the asset is sold
financial gain - the amount of monetary gain
References in periodicals archive ?
Once an unrealized capital gain is invested in a QOF, the tax deferment is incentivized by the length of the investment.
Specifically, a taxpayer can defer any amount of capital gain to the extent it is reinvested in one or more QOFs within the 180-day period beginning on the date the capital gain property is sold.
The term "capital gain" simply refers to a profit made by selling an asset for more than you paid for it.
So, for example, a taxpayer might have a passive income 20% capital gain, in which case the income category is passive and the rate group is 20%.
(NYSE: CHN) has declared capital gain and net investment income distributions in the estimated aggregate amount of USD1.4958 per share.
When you sell a capital asset, the difference between the basis in the asset and the amount you sell it for is a capital gain or a capital loss.
This is because if the property is sold within three years of purchase, the short-term capital gain is calculated by deducting from the sale price the cost of acquisition, the money spent on improving the property and the transfer cost.
The tax increase will definitely hurt the sale of those properties that have been held for long term, since their capital gain is substantial.
If property is classified as a "capital asset," then, upon its sale, any gain generally is considered a capital gain. Gain is the excess of the amount realized upon the sale over the basis (adjusted downward for depreciation or upward for additions to the property).
Typically, highly appreciated assets are good candidates for a CRT because the trustee can sell the assets and, as a tax-exempt entity, the trust will not be liable for capital gain taxes, so there are more funds available for investment.
Taxpayers must own an identifiable asset that was disposed of in a sale or exchange if they want to report a capital gain. In addition, they must list all the reasons for filing an amended return on the refund claim if they want the opportunity for a court to consider those reasons.
Price Responses to Changes in Anticipated Capital Gain Taxes