capitalism

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cap·i·tal·ism

 (kăp′ĭ-tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
An economic system in which the means of production and distribution are privately or corporately owned and development occurs through the accumulation and reinvestment of profits gained in a free market.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

capitalism

(ˈkæpɪtəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Economics) Also called: free enterprise or private enterprise an economic system based on the private ownership of the means of production, distribution, and exchange, characterized by the freedom of capitalists to operate or manage their property for profit in competitive conditions. Compare socialism1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cap•i•tal•ism

(ˈkæp ɪ tlˌɪz əm)

n.
an economic system in which investment in and ownership of the means of production, distribution, and exchange of wealth is made and maintained chiefly by private individuals or corporations.
[1850–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

capitalism

a system of economics under which ownership of and investment in the means of production and distribution depends chiefly upon corporations and private individuals. — capitalist, n. — capitalistic, adj.
See also: Economics
a theory or system in which property and investment in busines; are owned and controlled by individuals directly or through ownership of shares in companies. Cf. communism. — capitalist, n., adj.capitalistic, adj.
See also: Politics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

capitalism

1. An economic system essentially based on the private ownership of the means of production, distribution, and exchange.
2. An economic system in which the means of production are privately owned and producers compete to maximize their profits.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capitalism - an economic system based on private ownership of capitalcapitalism - an economic system based on private ownership of capital
venture capitalism - capitalism that invests in innovative enterprises (especially high technology) where the potential profits are large
free enterprise, laissez-faire economy, market economy, private enterprise - an economy that relies chiefly on market forces to allocate goods and resources and to determine prices
socialist economy, socialism - an economic system based on state ownership of capital
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

capitalism

noun private enterprise, free enterprise, private ownership, laissez faire or laisser faire the two fundamentally opposed social systems, capitalism and socialism
Quotations
"I think that Capitalism, wisely managed, can probably be made more efficient for attaining economic ends than any alternative system yet in sight, but that in itself it is in many ways extremely objectionable" [John Maynard Keynes The End of Laissez-Faire]
"You show me a capitalist, and I'll show you a bloodsucker" [Malcolm X]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
الرأسْماليّّهرأسماليةرَأْسُمالِيَّة
kapitalismuskapitalizmus
kapitalisme
kapitalismo
kapitalismi
kapitalizam
kapitalizmus
kapítalismi
資本主義
자본주의
capitalism
kapitalizmus
kapitalizem
kapitalism
ระบบทุนนิยม
kapitalizmanamalcılık
chủ nghĩa tư bản

capitalism

[ˈkæpɪtəlɪzəm] Ncapitalismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

capitalism

[ˈkæpɪtəlɪzəm] ncapitalisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

capitalism

nKapitalismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

capitalism

[ˈkæpɪtəlɪzm] ncapitalismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

capital1

(ˈkӕpitl) noun
1. the chief town or seat of government. Paris is the capital of France.
2. (also capital letter) any letter of the type found at the beginning of sentences, proper names etc. THESE ARE CAPITAL LETTERS / CAPITALS.
3. money (for investment etc). You need capital to start a new business.
adjective
1. involving punishment by death. a capital offence.
2. excellent. a capital idea.
3. (of a city) being a capital. Paris and other capital cities.
ˈcapitalism noun
a system of economics in which money and business are controlled by capitalists.
ˈcapitalist noun
a person who has much money in business concerns.
ˈcapitalist, ˌcapitaˈlistic adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

capitalism

رَأْسُمالِيَّة kapitalismus kapitalisme Kapitalismus καπιταλισμός capitalismo kapitalismi capitalisme kapitalizam capitalismo 資本主義 자본주의 kapitalisme kapitalisme kapitalizm capitalismo капитализм kapitalism ระบบทุนนิยม kapitalizm chủ nghĩa tư bản 资本主义
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Capitalism was adjudged by the sociologists of the time to be the culmination of bourgeois rule, the ripened fruit of the bourgeois revolution.
Capitalism has made socialism, and the laws made by the capitalism for the protection of property are responsible for anarchism.
He saw Capitalism doomed in its cradle, born with the poison of the principle of competition in its system.
It was a monster devouring with a thousand mouths, trampling with a thousand hoofs; it was the Great Butcher--it was the spirit of Capitalism made flesh.
Capitalism, organized for repressive purposes under pretext of governing the nation, would very soon stop the association if it understood our aim, but it thinks that we are engaged in gunpowder plots and conspiracies to assassinate crowned heads; and so, whilst the police are blundering in search of evidence of these, our real work goes on unmolested.
All the past corruption and cowardice is hampering us, of course; the West country is pretty stormy and doubtful even in a military sense; and the Irish regiments there, that are supposed to support us by the new treaty, are pretty well in mutiny; for, of course, this infernal coolie capitalism is being pushed in Ireland, too.
To cite a final example, consider Gray's analysis of East Asian capitalism. It is clear that he regards it as far superior to the American alternative, asserting, "In the contest between the American free market and the guided capitalisms of East Asia it is the free market that belongs to the past." Oops - no doubt this passage was written before the full dimensions of the Asian economic collapse had become apparent (the book was originally published in Britain in the spring of 1998).
In False Dawn, John Gray attempts to attack global capitalism at its intellectual roots.
The competition, moreover, was pervasive: communism challenged capitalism as an economic system, promising greater wealth and equity; it held up a different model of development for states and peoples seeking to capture the benefits of modern technology; it claimed to represent a better and higher form of democracy and to give a deeper meaning to democratic citizenship, making citiz enship economic and social as well as merely civic or political; and it proclaimed itself morally superior to capitalism for it could plausibly be said to encourage a more social and collective morality instead of the competitive individualism characteristic of liberal society.
I'm making this claim for one simple reason: we're living in a moment when, for the first time, capitalism has become a truly universal system.
Then international competition stepped into the breach, and suddenly post-cold War writers and pundits began noticing a fairly obvious fact: capitalism is not, and has never been, a monolith.
by John Gray, New York: The New Press, 234 pages, $25.00 In False Dawn, John Gray attempts to attack global capitalism at its intellectual roots.