capitellum


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Related to capitellum: Panner's disease

cap·i·tel·lum

 (kăp′ĭ-tĕl′əm)
n. pl. cap·i·tel·la (-tĕl′ə) Anatomy
The rounded protuberance at the lower end of the humerus that articulates with the radius.

[Late Latin, diminutive of Latin caput, capit-, head; see kaput- in Indo-European roots.]

capitellum

(ˌkæpɪˈtɛləm)
n, pl -la (-lə)
(Anatomy) anatomy an enlarged knoblike structure at the end of a bone that forms an articulation with another bone; capitulum
[C19: from Latin, diminutive of capitulum]
Translations

cap·i·tel·lum

n. capitelum.
1. bulbo de un pelo;
2. parte del húmero.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coronal shear fractures of distal humerus usually involve the capitellum and a variable part of the trochlea [1].
Apart from femoral condyles, the other bones affected by osteochondritis dissecans are talar dome, capitellum of the humerus.
Four patients sustained concomitant injuries to the same elbow in addition to the terrible triad pattern, including three patients with fracture of the radial neck and one patient with a capitellum fracture.
Existing radiographs (Figure 1), although taken under suboptimal conditions, revealed no malalignment of the radiocapitellar line, a line drawn along the long axis of the radial neck, which should bisect the capitellum on all projections [1].
Since the capitellum was intact and displacement of fracture fragment was anterior, antero-medial approach through the interval between flexor pronator muscles medially and the brachialis muscle laterally was utilized.
Laterally, the radial head articulates with the capitellum of the distal humerus.
For the rare procedure of fixation of osteochondral fragments of the capitellum, only case reports have been identified [19, 20].
It is now described as 1 cm distal and 1 cm anterior to the lateral epicondyle in a sulcus that can be felt between the radial head and capitellum. The portal passes through the ECRB and supinator and creates a view of the medial capsule, coronoid, and trochlea.
(22) They also included other joint surfaces, such as the talar dome, femoral head, capitellum, and humeral head.
The distal humerus is composed of the trochlea medially and the capitellum laterally.
It occurs with a fall from a height and results in the radial head impacting on the anterior articular cortex of the distal humerus, shearing off the capitellum and the lateral ridge of the trochlea.
The radial collateral ligament, or lateral collateral ligament, has its origination at the lateral humerus at the midpoint of the trochlea and capitellum on the axis of rotation of the elbow.