capitulary

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ca·pit·u·lar·y

 (kə-pĭch′ə-lĕr′ē)
n. pl. ca·pit·u·lar·ies
1. An ecclesiastical or civil ordinance.
2. A set of such ordinances, especially those promulgated by Charlemagne and his successors.

[Medieval Latin capitulārius, from capitulum, chapter; see chapter.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

capitulary

(kəˈpɪtjʊlərɪ)
n, pl -laries
(Historical Terms) any of the collections of ordinances promulgated by the Frankish kings (8th–10th centuries ad)
[C17: from Medieval Latin capitulāris; see capitular]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ca•pit•u•lar•y

(kəˈpɪtʃ əˌlɛr i)

n., pl. -lar•ies.
1. a member of a chapter, esp. of an ecclesiastical one.
2. an ordinance or law of a Frankish sovereign.
[1640–50; < Late Latin capitulārius=capitul(um) chapter + Latin -ārius -ary]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Capitulary

 a collection of ordinances, esp. of the Frankish kings; e.g., the capitulary of Worms, 829.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.capitulary - of or pertaining to an ecclesiastical chapter; "capitular estates"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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From the "Master of Sentences," he had passed to the "Capitularies of Charlemagne;" and he had devoured in succession, in his appetite for science, decretals upon decretals, those of Theodore, Bishop of Hispalus; those of Bouchard, Bishop of Worms; those of Yves, Bishop of Chartres; next the decretal of Gratian, which succeeded the capitularies of Charlemagne; then the collection of Gregory IX.; then the Epistle of
It will also suggest the importance of historical narratives that were indispensable as the means of constructing the image of the past and that cannot be overlooked even if modern historians possess a significant amount of administrative documents like capitularies that allow them to make conclusions about the period.
Unlike references to heavily mediatized economic and cultural capitals, capitularies on the "dependency road" (Smythe, 1981) such as Corsica, require contextualization before they can become "citable." In short, like other primarily rural spaces, Corsica's complex history and the current nature heritage tourism boom never make it to mainstream readings of globalization.
As representative of the first period, he has examined Carolingian capitularies (Capitulatio departibus saxoniae, ca.