capote

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ca·pote

 (kə-pōt′)
n.
1. A long, usually hooded cloak or coat.
2. (also kä-pō′tĕ) A large, usually purple and yellow cape used in maneuvering the bull especially during the initial stage of a bullfight.

[French, from Old French capote, capette, diminutive of cape, cloak, from Medieval Latin cāpa; see cape1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

capote

(kəˈpəʊt; French kapɔt)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a long cloak or soldier's coat, usually with a hood
[C19: from French: cloak, from cape; see cape1]

Capote

(kəˈpəʊtɪ)
n
(Biography) Truman. 1924–84, US writer; his novels include Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948) and In Cold Blood (1964), based on an actual multiple murder
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ca•pote

(kəˈpoʊt)

n.
a long cloak with a hood.
[1790–1800, Amer.; < French, derivative of cape cape]

Ca•po•te

(kəˈpoʊ ti)

n.
Truman, 1924–84, U.S. novelist and playwright.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capote - a long overcoat with a hood that can be pulled over the head
greatcoat, overcoat, topcoat - a heavy coat worn over clothes in winter
2.capote - a long cloak with a hood that can be pulled over the headcapote - a long cloak with a hood that can be pulled over the head
cloak - a loose outer garment
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Kapotte
References in classic literature ?
Cannon and musketry, mingling together, thundered on the right and in the center, while the capotes of Lannes' sharpshooters were already seen crossing the milldam and forming up within twice the range of a musket shot.
For days they suffered the doleful rigors and retchings of sea-sickness, lurking below in their berths in squalid state, or emerging now and then like spectres from the hatchways, in capotes and blankets, with dirty nightcaps, grizzly beard, lantern visage and unhappy eye, shivering about the deck, and ever and anon crawling to the sides of the vessel, and offering up their tributes to the windward, to infinite annoyance of the captain.
There is no particle of trimming about this monstrous capote, as they call it--it is just a plain, ugly dead- blue mass of sail, and a woman can't go within eight points of the wind with one of them on; she has to go before the wind or not at all.
`I know, but I'm afraid to look at a gun now.' She picked up one of the drakes and ruffled his green capote with her fingers.
Eventually the Capotes moved to Greenwich, Connecticut, and Truman attended the upscale Greenwich High, where he began to grow into the unconventional and decidedly attractive "character" that would soon ravish literary New York.
Truman had too many other interests to bother with schoolwork; he failed to graduate with his class and, since the Capotes were returning to Manhattan, he was enrolled in a school that catered to students who couldn't make the grade elsewhere.
When Truman Capote died in 1984, just before his sixtieth birthday, his life had been in a shambles for years.
Richard Capote has joined Lippes Mathias Wexler Friedman LLP as an associate in the real estate practice group where he will focus on the leasing, acquisition, sale and financing of commercial real estate.