caprice


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ca·price

 (kə-prēs′)
n.
1.
a. An impulsive change of mind: "I find it a relief that plagues and cancers ... are the result of the impartial—and comprehensible—forces of evolution rather than the caprices of a deity" (Olivia Judson).
b. An inclination to change one's mind impulsively: tyrants who rule by caprice.
c. A sudden, unpredictable action or change: the caprices of the wind.
2. Music A capriccio.

[French, from Italian capriccio, from caporiccio, fright, sudden start (originally, "head with the hair standing on end (resembling a hedgehog)", but later influenced by capra, goat, because of goats' frisky movements) : capo, head (from Latin caput; see kaput- in Indo-European roots) + riccio, curly (from Latin ēricius, hedgehog, from ēr).]

caprice

(kəˈpriːs)
n
1. a sudden or unpredictable change of attitude, behaviour, etc; whim
2. a tendency to such changes
3. (Classical Music) another word for capriccio
[C17: from French, from Italian capriccio a shiver, caprice, from capo head + riccio hedgehog, suggesting a convulsive shudder in which the hair stood on end like a hedgehog's spines; meaning also influenced by Italian capra goat, by folk etymology]

ca•price

(kəˈpris)

n.
1. a sudden, unpredictable change, as of one's mind or of the weather; vagary.
2. a tendency to change one's mind without apparent or adequate motive; whimsicality; capriciousness.
[1660–70; < French < Italian; see capriccio]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caprice - a sudden desire; "he bought it on an impulse"
desire - the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state

caprice

noun whim, notion, impulse, freak, fad, quirk, vagary, whimsy, humour, fancy, fickleness, inconstancy, fitfulness, changeableness Her life was spent in terror of her husband's sudden caprices and mood swings.

caprice

noun
An impulsive, often illogical turn of mind:
Translations
لَحْنٌ موسيقيٌّ مُخالِفٌنَزْوَةٌ، هَوى
capricciorozmar
capricciofiks ideletlivliglunefuldt indfald
capriccio
duttlungurgletta, fjörlegt tónverk
kapričokaprizaskaprizingaskaprizingumasužgaida
kapričokaprīzeuntums
capriccio
kapriçiyokaprismaymun iştahlılıkserbest bestelenmiş şen hafif müzik

caprice

[kəˈpriːs] Ncapricho m, antojo m

caprice

n
Laune(nhaftigkeit) f, → Kaprice f (geh)
(Mus) → Capriccio nt

caprice

[kəˈpriːs] ncapriccio

caprice

(kəˈpriːs) noun
1. an especially unreasonable sudden change of mind etc; a whim. I'm tired of the old man and his caprices.
2. a fanciful and lively piece of music etc.
capricious (kəˈpriʃəs) adjective
changeable. She may change her mind – she's very capricious.
caˈpriciously adverb
caˈpriciousness noun
References in classic literature ?
I am still doubtful at times as to marrying; if the old man would die I might not hesitate, but a state of dependance on the caprice of Sir Reginald will not suit the freedom of my spirit; and if I resolve to wait for that event, I shall have excuse enough at present in having been scarcely ten months a widow.
That is not all; then, you say, science itself will teach man (though to my mind it's a superfluous luxury) that he never has really had any caprice or will of his own, and that he himself is something of the nature of a piano-key or the stop of an organ, and that there are, besides, things called the laws of nature; so that everything he does is not done by his willing it, but is done of itself, by the laws of nature.
We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lot according to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the many delights which we enjoyed.
She made no ineffectual efforts to conduct her household en bonne menagere, going and coming as it suited her fancy, and, so far as she was able, lending herself to any passing caprice.
Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and- twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character.
Gervinus, Schlosser, and others, for instance, at one time prove Napoleon to be a product of the Revolution, of the ideas of 1789 and so forth, and at another plainly say that the campaign of 1812 and other things they do not like were simply the product of Napoleon's misdirected will, and that the very ideas of 1789 were arrested in their development by Napoleon's caprice.
My father explained the literary caprice, but it remained a confusion and a trouble for me, and I made a practice of skipping those passages where either author insisted upon his invention.
Without conscious intention he began to clutch at every passing caprice, taking it for a desire and an object.
In the matter of wills, personal qualities were subordinate to the great fundamental fact of blood; and to be determined in the distribution of your property by caprice, and not make your legacies bear a direct ratio to degrees of kinship, was a prospective disgrace that would have embittered her life.
As to any other kind of discipline, whether addressed to her mind or heart, little Pearl might or might not be within its reach, in accordance with the caprice that ruled the moment.
But who can say what experiments may be produced by the caprice of particular States, by the ambition of enterprising leaders, or by the intrigues and influence of foreign powers?
There, on a table, surrounded at some distance by a large and luxurious divan, every species of tobacco known, -- from the yellow tobacco of Petersburg to the black of Sinai, and so on along the scale from Maryland and Porto-Rico, to Latakia, -- was exposed in pots of crackled earthenware of which the Dutch are so fond; beside them, in boxes of fragrant wood, were ranged, according to their size and quality, pueros, regalias, havanas, and manillas; and, in an open cabinet, a collection of German pipes, of chibouques, with their amber mouth-pieces ornamented with coral, and of narghiles, with their long tubes of morocco, awaiting the caprice or the sympathy of the smokers.