caprice

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ca·price

 (kə-prēs′)
n.
1.
a. An impulsive change of mind: "I find it a relief that plagues and cancers ... are the result of the impartial—and comprehensible—forces of evolution rather than the caprices of a deity" (Olivia Judson).
b. An inclination to change one's mind impulsively: tyrants who rule by caprice.
c. A sudden, unpredictable action or change: the caprices of the wind.
2. Music A capriccio.

[French, from Italian capriccio, from caporiccio, fright, sudden start (originally, "head with the hair standing on end (resembling a hedgehog)", but later influenced by capra, goat, because of goats' frisky movements) : capo, head (from Latin caput; see kaput- in Indo-European roots) + riccio, curly (from Latin ēricius, hedgehog, from ēr).]

caprice

(kəˈpriːs)
n
1. a sudden or unpredictable change of attitude, behaviour, etc; whim
2. a tendency to such changes
3. (Classical Music) another word for capriccio
[C17: from French, from Italian capriccio a shiver, caprice, from capo head + riccio hedgehog, suggesting a convulsive shudder in which the hair stood on end like a hedgehog's spines; meaning also influenced by Italian capra goat, by folk etymology]

ca•price

(kəˈpris)

n.
1. a sudden, unpredictable change, as of one's mind or of the weather; vagary.
2. a tendency to change one's mind without apparent or adequate motive; whimsicality; capriciousness.
[1660–70; < French < Italian; see capriccio]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caprice - a sudden desire; "he bought it on an impulse"
desire - the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state

caprice

noun whim, notion, impulse, freak, fad, quirk, vagary, whimsy, humour, fancy, fickleness, inconstancy, fitfulness, changeableness Her life was spent in terror of her husband's sudden caprices and mood swings.

caprice

noun
An impulsive, often illogical turn of mind:
Translations
لَحْنٌ موسيقيٌّ مُخالِفٌنَزْوَةٌ، هَوى
capricciorozmar
capricciofiks ideletlivliglunefuldt indfald
capriccio
duttlungurgletta, fjörlegt tónverk
kapričokaprizaskaprizingaskaprizingumasužgaida
kapričokaprīzeuntums
capriccio
kapriçiyokaprismaymun iştahlılıkserbest bestelenmiş şen hafif müzik

caprice

[kəˈpriːs] Ncapricho m, antojo m

caprice

n
Laune(nhaftigkeit) f, → Kaprice f (geh)
(Mus) → Capriccio nt

caprice

[kəˈpriːs] ncapriccio

caprice

(kəˈpriːs) noun
1. an especially unreasonable sudden change of mind etc; a whim. I'm tired of the old man and his caprices.
2. a fanciful and lively piece of music etc.
capricious (kəˈpriʃəs) adjective
changeable. She may change her mind – she's very capricious.
caˈpriciously adverb
caˈpriciousness noun
References in classic literature ?
By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge.
My caprices are at an end, and my violent temper has tried your forbearance for the last time.
With these they supply their own wants and caprices, and carry on the internal trade for horses already mentioned.
There were collected and piled up all Albert's successive caprices, hunting-horns, bass-viols, flutes -- a whole orchestra, for Albert had had not a taste but a fancy for music; easels, palettes, brushes, pencils -- for music had been succeeded by painting; foils, boxing-gloves, broadswords, and single-sticks -- for, following the example of the fashionable young men of the time, Albert de Morcerf cultivated, with far more perseverance than music and drawing, the three arts that complete a dandy's education, i.e., fencing, boxing, and single-stick; and it was here that he received Grisier, Cook, and Charles Leboucher.
'My lord's caprices' (Ferrari wrote) 'have kept us perpetually on the move.
I am still doubtful at times as to marrying; if the old man would die I might not hesitate, but a state of dependance on the caprice of Sir Reginald will not suit the freedom of my spirit; and if I resolve to wait for that event, I shall have excuse enough at present in having been scarcely ten months a widow.
That is not all; then, you say, science itself will teach man (though to my mind it's a superfluous luxury) that he never has really had any caprice or will of his own, and that he himself is something of the nature of a piano-key or the stop of an organ, and that there are, besides, things called the laws of nature; so that everything he does is not done by his willing it, but is done of itself, by the laws of nature.