captiously


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cap·tious

 (kăp′shəs)
adj.
1. Marked by a disposition to find and point out trivial faults: a captious scholar.
2. Intended to entrap or confuse, as in an argument: a captious question.

[Middle English capcious, from Old French captieux, from Latin captiōsus, from captiō, seizure, sophism, from captus, past participle of capere, to seize; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

cap′tious·ly adv.
cap′tious·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.captiously - in a captious, carping manner; "he was captiously pedantic"
References in classic literature ?
We are not boy and girl, to be captiously irritable, misled by every moment's inadvertence, and wantonly playing with our own happiness." And yet, a few minutes afterwards, she felt as if their being in company with each other, under their present circumstances, could only be exposing them to inadvertencies and misconstructions of the most mischievous kind.
Featherstone, captiously. "She was for reading when she sat with me.
Genovese, in his turn, argues that the concepts of "participatory democracy" and "equity", repeatedly invoked by crits as opposed to the liberal order, remain captiously uncertain (33).