captor

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cap·tor

 (kăp′tər, -tôr′)
n.
One that takes another as a captive.

[Late Latin, hunter, from Latin capere, to seize; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

captor

(ˈkæptə)
n
a person or animal that holds another captive
[C17: from Latin, from capere to take]

cap•tor

(ˈkæp tər)

n.
a person who has captured a person or thing.
[1640–50; < Late Latin, = Latin cap(ere) to take + -tor -tor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.captor - a person who captures and holds people or animalscaptor - a person who captures and holds people or animals
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
abductor, kidnaper, kidnapper, snatcher - someone who unlawfully seizes and detains a victim (usually for ransom)
surpriser - a captor who uses surprise to capture the victim
liberator - someone who releases people from captivity or bondage

captor

noun jailer or gaoler, guard, keeper, custodian They did not know what their captors had planned for them.
Translations
آسِر، سابِ
únosce
bortfører
fogvatartó
sá sem tekur til fanga; ná á sitt vald
tutsak eden

captor

[ˈkæptəʳ] Ncaptor(a) m/f, apresador(a) m/f

captor

[ˈkæptər] n
[child, woman, hostage] → ravisseur m
(lawful) his captors → les auteurs mpl de son arrestation
[fish] → pêcheur m

captor

nderjenige, der jdn gefangen nimmt; his captors treated him kindlyer wurde nach seiner Gefangennahme gut behandelt; his captors were Ruritanianer wurde von Ruritaniern gefangen genommen; his captors later freed himman ließ ihn später wieder frei

captor

[ˈkæptəʳ] n (lawful) → chi ha catturato; (unlawful) → rapitore/trice
he managed to escape from his captors → riuscì a sfuggire a quelli che l'avevano catturato

captive

(ˈkӕptiv) noun
a prisoner. Two of the captives escaped.
adjective
kept prisoner. captive soldiers; The children were taken/held captive.
capˈtivity noun
a state of being a prisoner, caged etc. animals in captivity in a zoo.
ˈcaptor noun
a person who captures someone. He managed to escape from his captors.
ˈcapture (-tʃə) verb
1. to take by force, skill etc. The soldiers captured the castle; Several animals were captured.
2. to take possession of (a person's attention etc). The story captured his imagination.
noun
1. the act of capturing.
2. something caught. A kangaroo was his most recent capture.
References in classic literature ?
Along the bed of the old watercourse that once ran through the gorge they made their way, and as the first faint lightening of the eastern horizon presaged the coming dawn, they paused for a moment upon the edge of a declivity, which appeared to the girl in the strange light of the waning night as a vast, bottomless pit; but, as their captors resumed their way and the light of the new day became stronger, she saw that they were moving downward toward a dense forest.
His captors had been as inquisitive as to his strange clothing as had mine, with the same result.
Toward the center of the city was a large plaza, and upon this and in the buildings immediately surrounding it were camped some nine or ten hundred creatures of the same breed as my captors, for such I now considered them despite the suave manner in which I had been trapped.
"Come!" said one of her captors, both of whom had retained a hold upon her.
It was immediately following his transfer in mid-air that Bradley made out the shadowy form of a large island far ahead, and not long after, he realized that this must be the intended destination of his captors. Nor was he mistaken.
The instant the shock of this sudden misfortune had abated, Duncan began to make his observations on the appearance and proceedings of their captors. Contrary to the usages of the natives in the wantonness of their success they had respected, not only the persons of the trembling sisters, but his own.
Delcarte and Taylor were now in mid-stream, coming toward us, and I called to them to keep aloof until I knew whether the intentions of my captors were friendly or otherwise.
The leaping carnivora and the plunging horses, prevented any concerted action by the Abyssinians--it was every man for himself--and in the melee, the defenseless woman was either forgotten or ignored by her black captors. A score of times was her life menaced by charging lions, by plunging horses, or by the wildly fired bullets of the frightened troopers, yet there was no chance of escape, for now with the fiendish cunning of their kind, the tawny hunters commenced to circle about their prey, hemming them within a ring of mighty, yellow fangs, and sharp, long talons.
As we drew near their black inhabitants swarmed out in great numbers and surrounded us, and we were led to their houses, and as it were divided among our captors. I with five others was taken into a hut, where we were made to sit upon the ground, and certain herbs were given to us, which the blacks made signs to us to eat.
To one of these houses which had neither doors nor windows, but only one broad opening far up underneath the roof, the prisoners were brought by their captors. The Gargoyles roughly pushed them into the opening, where there was a platform, and then flew away and left them.
Yet as she glanced from them to her new captors she could not but feel that she would prefer captivity in one of the settlements they were passing--there at least she might find an opportunity to communicate with her father, or be discovered by the rescue party as it came up the river.
But when the guard was relieved next morning, Pierre felt that for the new guard- both officers and men- he was not as interesting as he had been to his captors; and in fact the guard of the second day did not recognize in this big, stout man in a peasant coat the vigorous person who had fought so desperately with the marauder and the convoy and had uttered those solemn words about saving a child; they saw in him only No.