carangid


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ca·ran·gid

 (kə-răn′jĭd, -răng′gĭd)
n.
Any of a large family (Carangidae) of marine food and game fishes, such as the jacks and pompanos.

[From New Latin Carangidae, family name, from French carangue, mackerel, from Spanish caranga, perhaps ultimately from Latin cancer, crab.]

ca·ran′gid adj.

carangid

(kəˈrændʒɪd; -ˈræŋɡɪd) or

carangoid

n
(Animals) any marine percoid fish of the family Carangidae, having a compressed body and deeply forked tail. The group includes the jacks, horse mackerel, pompano, and pilot fish
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Carangidae
[C19: from New Latin Carangidae, from Caranx type genus, from French carangue shad, from Spanish caranga, of obscure origin]

ca•ran•gid

(kəˈræn dʒɪd)

n.
1. any of numerous fishes of the family Carangidae, comprising the jacks, scads, pompanos, and cavallas.
adj.
2. belonging or pertaining to the carangids.
[1885–90; < New Latin Carangidae <Carang-, s. of Caranx genus name]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carangid - a percoid fish of the family Carangidae
percoid, percoid fish, percoidean - any of numerous spiny-finned fishes of the order Perciformes
Carangidae, family Carangidae - large family of narrow-bodied marine food fishes with widely forked tails; chiefly of warm seas
jack - any of several fast-swimming predacious fishes of tropical to warm temperate seas
horsefish, horsehead, horse-head, moonfish, Selene setapinnis, Atlantic moonfish, dollarfish - any of several silvery marine fishes with very flat bodies
pompano - any of several deep-bodied food fishes of western Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico
Naucrates ductor, pilotfish - small pelagic fish often accompanying sharks or mantas
scad - any of a number of fishes of the family Carangidae
Adj.1.carangid - of or relating to fish of the family Carangidae
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of antibiotics on survival of carangid fish larvae (Caranx mate), reared in the laboratory.
Osteological development of the caudal skeleton in the carangid, Seriola lalandi.
Cha, McGowan and Richards (1994) sampled fish larvae off the Florida Keys and found that 92.4 % of the carangid larvae occurred in the upper 25 m of the water column, and 100 % occurred in the upper 50 m (Fernandez-Cordeiro & Banon-Diaz, 1997).
It's also not in Alan Davidson's 'Seafood of South-East Asia' (Ten Speed Press, 1976 and 2003), where the author identifies a particular fish as Bigeye Trevally, a Carangid fish that Filipinos refer to as maliputo.
Peters, "Maximum sustainable speed, energetics and swimming kinematics of a tropical carangid fish, the green jack Caranx caballus," Journal of Fish Biology, vol.
Seabrook provided an account of the pursuit of the Black Jack fish (Caranx lugubris), a carangid that inhabits inshore waters.
We therefore investigated the light sensitivity, spectral sensitivity, and temporal visual resolution of juvenile Pacific bluefin tunas by using an electroretinogram (ERG) technique, and we compared the results with those obtained in chub mackerel (a pelagic scombrid fish) and striped jack (Pseudocaranx dentex), a coastal carangid fish.
The most abundant genera of medium-sized fish belong to the scombrid family (Scombridae), the mackerel (Scomber) and the Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus), or to the carangid family (Carangidae), such as the saurel (Trachurus) and jacks or kingfish (Seriola).
Some 14 varieties are commercially harvested from the Gulf, among them the silvery or golden yellow Talang queenfish (50 to 100 cm) and the Golden toothless crevally (a relatively large carangid that can exceed one meter in length).