carapace


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Related to carapace: gastric mill, Swimmerets

car·a·pace

 (kăr′ə-pās′)
n.
1. Zoology A hard bony or chitinous outer covering, such as the fused dorsal plates of a turtle or the portion of the exoskeleton covering the head and thorax of a crustacean.
2. A protective, shell-like covering likened to that of a turtle or crustacean: "He used to worry that Sarah would age the same way, develop the same brittle carapace" (Anne Tyler).

[French, from Spanish carapacho.]

carapace

(ˈkærəˌpeɪs) or

carapax

n
(Zoology) the thick hard shield, made of chitin or bone, that covers part of the body of crabs, lobsters, tortoises, etc
[C19: from French, from Spanish carapacho, of unknown origin]

car•a•pace

(ˈkær əˌpeɪs)

n.
a bony or chitinous shield, test, or shell covering some or all of the dorsal part of an animal, as of a turtle.
[1830–40; < French < Sp carapacho]
car′a•paced`, adj.

car·a·pace

(kăr′ə-pās′)
A hard outer covering or shell made of bone or chitin on the back of animals such as turtles, armadillos, lobsters, and crabs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carapace - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtlescarapace - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtles
turtle - any of various aquatic and land reptiles having a bony shell and flipper-like limbs for swimming
arthropod - invertebrate having jointed limbs and a segmented body with an exoskeleton made of chitin
cuticula - the outer body wall of an insect
scute - large bony or horny plate as on an armadillo or turtle or the underside of a snake
mollusc, mollusk, shellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
shell - the material that forms the hard outer covering of many animals
Translations
panssari

carapace

[ˈkærəpeɪs] Ncarapacho m

carapace

nSchale f; (of tortoise etc)(Rücken)panzer m
References in classic literature ?
I can thus only understand a fact with which I was much struck when examining cirripedes, and of which many other instances could be given: namely, that when a cirripede is parasitic within another and is thus protected, it loses more or less completely its own shell or carapace. This is the case with the male Ibla, and in a truly extraordinary manner with the Proteolepas: for the carapace in all other cirripedes consists of the three highly-important anterior segments of the head enormously developed, and furnished with great nerves and muscles; but in the parasitic and protected Proteolepas, the whole anterior part of the head is reduced to the merest rudiment attached to the bases of the prehensile antennae.
It is prohibited to capture individuals of both sexes with a carapace width of < 6.0 cm, and there is an annual period in which the harvest of female crabs is prohibited in the States of North and Northeast.
The log transformed carapace length-weight relationship for male form I (y = 3.3201x - 4.0205, [r.sup.2] = 0.9645, F = 1302.9, p = <0.001), and juveniles (y = 3.2792x - 4.0171, [r.sup.2] = 0.8721, F = 709.2, p = <0.001) showed positive allometric growth rates, whereas male form II (y = 2.8831x - 3.4474, [r.sup.2] = 0.8268, F = 248.2, p = <0.001) and female (y = 2.9184x - 3.5313, [r.sup.2] = 0.9395, F = 1879.3, p = <0.001) showed negative allometric rates of change with increasing length.
Sexual shape dimorphism in body shape changes was argued to have important ecological consequences and evolutionary trends [10] thus, was applied in this study on Perisesarma bidens, the most common mangrove crab inhabiting intertidal zone to high tide mark, This study will look into describing variations in carapace shapes between the male and females sexes which may have important ecological consequences since the species is adapted to the sediment conditions, tidal fluctuations, and varying salinities found in the mangroves [11].
The genus has a strong association with grasses and displays several co-evolved, adaptive characteristics such as a very elongate abdomen, a flat carapace, and light- to dark-brown longitudinal bands along the carapace and abdomen, all of which aid crypsis in grasses.
The objectives of the present study was to isolate chitosan from indigenous fishery crustacean waste (shrimp head shell, crab leg shells, crab claw shells, and crab carapace), to compare its physicochemical and functional characteristics.
Last May 11, an adult female green sea turtle with four gunshot wounds in her carapace was rescued and released to the sea three days later.
Small (carapace width, <30 mm) and large (carapace width, >30 mm) crabs were offered small (test width, <7 mm), medium (test width, 7-8.9 mm), large (test width, 9-10.9 mm), and extra large (test width, >11 mm) ivory barnacles.
With the exception of carapace width, there were no significant differences found in hatchling mass or carapace length among the two groups.
pelagicus (12-14 cm in external carapace width) with heart beating stage was obtained from the coastal zone of Chonburi province, Thailand.
In fact, they are almost entirely enclosed by a carapace, the anterior of which encloses their head, like a helmet.
Les hommes de Sandjak, qui sont revenus avec le point du nul de la [beaucoup moins que]cuisine[beaucoup plus grand que] du CRB oE cette fois-ci ils n'ont pas ete deplumes, ont ainsi garde plumes et duvet en faisant montre d'une bonne carapace. Une carapace qui, avant d'etre physique, l'a ete d'abord psychologique.