carapace

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car·a·pace

 (kăr′ə-pās′)
n.
1. Zoology A hard bony or chitinous outer covering, such as the fused dorsal plates of a turtle or the portion of the exoskeleton covering the head and thorax of a crustacean.
2. A protective, shell-like covering likened to that of a turtle or crustacean: "He used to worry that Sarah would age the same way, develop the same brittle carapace" (Anne Tyler).

[French, from Spanish carapacho.]

carapace

(ˈkærəˌpeɪs) or

carapax

n
(Zoology) the thick hard shield, made of chitin or bone, that covers part of the body of crabs, lobsters, tortoises, etc
[C19: from French, from Spanish carapacho, of unknown origin]

car•a•pace

(ˈkær əˌpeɪs)

n.
a bony or chitinous shield, test, or shell covering some or all of the dorsal part of an animal, as of a turtle.
[1830–40; < French < Sp carapacho]
car′a•paced`, adj.

car·a·pace

(kăr′ə-pās′)
A hard outer covering or shell made of bone or chitin on the back of animals such as turtles, armadillos, lobsters, and crabs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carapace - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtlescarapace - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtles
turtle - any of various aquatic and land reptiles having a bony shell and flipper-like limbs for swimming
arthropod - invertebrate having jointed limbs and a segmented body with an exoskeleton made of chitin
cuticula - the outer body wall of an insect
scute - large bony or horny plate as on an armadillo or turtle or the underside of a snake
mollusc, mollusk, shellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
shell - the material that forms the hard outer covering of many animals
Translations
panssari

carapace

[ˈkærəpeɪs] Ncarapacho m

carapace

nSchale f; (of tortoise etc)(Rücken)panzer m
References in classic literature ?
This is the case with the male Ibla, and in a truly extraordinary manner with the Proteolepas: for the carapace in all other cirripedes consists of the three highly-important anterior segments of the head enormously developed, and furnished with great nerves and muscles; but in the parasitic and protected Proteolepas, the whole anterior part of the head is reduced to the merest rudiment attached to the bases of the prehensile antennae.
Dorsal views of adult males yielded photographs of 63 carapaces (26 from Sao Luis, Maranhao (MA); 13 from Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (RN); 5 from Maceio, Alagoas (AL); 7 from Ilheus, Bahia (BA); 8 from Aracruz, Espirito Santo (ES); and 4 from Guaratuba, Parana (PR)) and 59 right cheliped propodi (24 from MA; 12 from RN; 4 from AL; 7 from BA; 8 from ES; and 4 from PR), using a Fujifilm Finepix HS10 camera (Fujifilm, Tokyo, Japan) with a resolution of 10 megapixels (Table 2).
Satellite transmitters were also attached to the carapaces of some of the turtles.
Twenty one symmetric and homologue anatomic landmarks (coordinates) were recognized on aeglid carapaces in each image (Fig.
In case of white shrimps only head shell was taken and for blue crab (male + female) further segregation into shells of legs, claws and carapaces was done to get four different raw materials (Fig.
aestuarii can be distinguished from other crabs by its fan-shaped carapaces, five sharp teeth at anterio-lateral region behind the eyes and 3 lobs between orbitals (Yamada and Hauck, 2001).
3)--were applied directly to normal and abraded juvenile lobster carapaces, and then monitored for persistence over time and for the development of shell-disease lesions at 3 different temperatures (10[degrees]C, 15[degrees]C, and 20[degrees]C).
Two modifications were made to the basic attachment protocol in 2007: 1) 60-grit sandpaper was utilized instead of 100-grit to sand the turtles' carapaces and PTT's; and 2) the first 10-15 cm of Power-Fast+ epoxy discharged from an applicator nozzle was discarded after discovery that epoxy initially discharged from a new nozzle and/or cartridge may not ever fully cure due to inadequate mixing (Morehead (2)).
Inspection of this data reveals that half of the twelve modern turtles were found with their carapaces up.
Brittle carapaces of beetles to keep company the human husk.