caravaneer

caravaneer

(ˌkærəvænˈɪə)
n
the person leading a caravan of camels
References in periodicals archive ?
Irineo's caravaneer life is hard, but he doesn't see it this way.
At night, we camp in stone corrals that salt caravaneers built generations before Irineo was born--always near water and firewood.
I will return to a world far from the Andes and the exciting lives of the llama salt caravaneers.
If grain at your disposal is scarce, write me and I can load up 50,000 donkey (measures) and convey it by a caravaneer [Veenhof 1992, "at the earliest opportunity"] to Marl.
These were nomads and farmers, seafarers and caravaneers, slaves and freemen, merchants and mercenaries, colonists and zealots.
The construction of and additions to triliths, or re-use of the associated hearths, may have both constructed a group identity and served as symbols of communal territorial rights that could be read by mobile pastoralists and caravaneers moving through an area only seasonally occupied.
The Midianites are portrayed in these [biblical] traditions as nomadic sheep and camel herders, caravaneers, and raiders, ranging over a wide territory to the south and east of Canaan.