caravaneer

caravaneer

(ˌkærəvænˈɪə)
n
the person leading a caravan of camels
References in periodicals archive ?
(31.) Another autobiography by a Ladakhi caravaneer is Abdul Wahid Radhu's Caravane Tibetaine (Paris: Fayard, 1981).
The caravaneer commercial bourgeoisie, which has always been composed of a certain percentage of Muslims, has grown less religiously homogenous, a potential source of friction which, so far, seems to have been contained in favour of a more desirable common interest: economic and political stability.
As of the 9th century A.D., way stations appeared in the area to tend to the needs of the caravaneers and their animals plying trans-Himalayan trade routes.
"If grain at your disposal is scarce, write me and I can load up 50,000 donkey (measures) and convey it by a caravaneer [Veenhof 1992, "at the earliest opportunity"] to Marl." But I, because I have relied on you, answered him saying: "Don't transport any grain to me; there is much of it here.
Shimea, groom of the chief of the caravaneers" (nt tpn dkm l-bb mn VIII sm" mr rb [prm]).
Crossing wild, inhospitable terrain on poorly maintained trails, the salt caravaneers of Dolpa faced severe hardship and danger.
These were nomads and farmers, seafarers and caravaneers, slaves and freemen, merchants and mercenaries, colonists and zealots.
(4.) "The Midianites are portrayed in these [biblical] traditions as nomadic sheep and camel herders, caravaneers, and raiders, ranging over a wide territory to the south and east of Canaan." The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East.
Having obtained some armed men from the rajah she takes hostage some caravaneers from Kec.