caravanserai

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car·a·van·sa·ry

 (kăr′ə-văn′sə-rē) also car·a·van·se·rai (-rī′)
n. pl. car·a·van·sa·ries also car·a·van·se·rais
1. An inn built around a large court for accommodating caravans along trade routes in central and western Asia.
2. A large inn or hostelry. In both senses also called serai.

[French caravanserai, from Persian kārvānsarāy : kārvān, caravan + sarāy, camp, palace; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

caravanserai

,

caravansarai

or

caravansary

n, pl -rais or -ries
(in some Eastern countries esp formerly) a large inn enclosing a courtyard providing accommodation for caravans
[C16: from Persian kārwānsarāī caravan inn]

caravanserai

- A type of inn in Eastern countries where caravans are put up.
See also related terms for inn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caravanserai - an inn in some eastern countries with a large courtyard that provides accommodation for caravanscaravanserai - an inn in some eastern countries with a large courtyard that provides accommodation for caravans
auberge, hostel, hostelry, inn, lodge - a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
Translations

caravanserai

caravansary [ˌkærəˈvænsəraɪ, ˌkærəˈvænsərɪ] Ncaravasar m

caravanserai

nKarawanserei f

caravanserai

[ˌkærəˈvænsəˌraɪ] ncaravanserraglio
References in periodicals archive ?
The city will also include traditional hotels called caravansaries and three mosques; one is named after 'The Mother of the Nation', the other after the late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum and the third will be called the Sheikha Latifa bint Hamdan Al Nahyan mosque.
The project will also include traditional hotels called caravansaries, three mosques, one is named after "The Mother of the Nation", the other named after the late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum, and the third one called the Sheikha Latifa bint Hamdan Al Nahyan mosque.
While most nights are spent in local hotels, two nights are spent in traditional caravansaries and another two in desert campsites, adding some adventure to the tour.
Damascus, SANA- Khans or caravansaries in Damascus Old City were roadside inns where travelers could rest and recover from the day's journey.
In this area two caravansaries or inns can be noted, built of stone and the type of architecture shows that both were constructed simultaneously during the Safavid era.
This magnificent bit of history is one of the many khans or caravansaries which had been built by Fakhreddine II for merchants back in the 17th century.
In the past Caravans who transported goods and passengers to other cities, entered caravansaries which were located at the end of the main division of bazar near the city gate[10]
The exhibition presents photographs of architectural structures such as mosques, caravansaries and mausoleums dating back to the Seljuk period, which stretched from the 11th century to the 13th.