carbohydrates


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

carbohydrates

(ˌkɑːbəʊˈhaɪdreɪts)
pl n
foods which contain carbohydrate

carbohydrates

1. Compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Some are energy-rich (e.g. glucose, starch); others are structural (e.g. cellulose).
2. Organic compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. They include starches, sugars, and cellulose. Carbohydrate foods provide energy. See disaccharides, monosaccharides, polysaccharides.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He studied the composition of food-stuffs, and knew exactly how many proteids and carbohydrates his body needed; and by scientific chewing he said that he tripled the value of all he ate, so that it cost him eleven cents a day.
Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis.
They agreed that by focusing on diet quality -- replacing saturated or trans fats with unsaturated fats and replacing refined carbohydrates with whole grains and nonstarchy vegetables -- most people can maintain good health within a broad range of fat-to-carbohydrate ratios.
It is because these complex carbohydrates are naturally rich in fibre, a nutrient found in plant foods that adds bulk to the diet without adding extra calories.
Washington D.C [USA], Sep 25 ( ANI ): According to a new study, diets high in carbohydrates reduce body weight and body fat and improve insulin function in overweight individuals.
Eating carbohydrates in moderation seems to be optimal for health and living a long life, the research found.
After multivariable adjustment, there was a U-shaped association between the percentage of energy consumed from carbohydrate and mortality in the ARIC cohort; the lowest risk of mortality was seen for a percentage of 50 to 55 percent energy from carbohydrates.
Results showed a U-shape association between overall carbohydrate intake and life expectancy, with low (less than 40% of calories from carbohydrates) and high (more than 70%) intake of carbohydrates associated with a higher risk of mortality compared with moderate intake (50%-55% of calories).
Our results show that better parental knowledge of carbohydrate counting was associated with improved glycaemic control, while underestimation of carbohydrates was associated with a higher HbA1c.
Interestingly, in China people have shifted away from the traditional Chinese diet (which is naturally low in fat and high in carbohydrates) and have experienced a rise in obesity and chronic disease rates.
Carbohydrate counting or "carb counting" is a meal planning technique for persons with diabetes for managing blood glucose levels by tracking the grams of carbohydrate consumed at meals.